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  5. "En unu litro da supo, estas …

"En unu litro da supo, estas multe da akvo."

Translation:In one liter of soup, there is a lot of water.

August 16, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piano.z

why not "in A liter of soup?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vikungen

Because unu means one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AghaZC

one is exchangeable with 'a'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

It's a matter of emphasis. "One" emphasizes the quantity, whereas "a" emphasizes the lack of specificity.

En litro da supo, estas multe da akvo.

In a liter of soup, there's a lot of water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

In the list of translations for 'unu', there are 'one' and 'an'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/queenga83

In one liter of soup there has much water. - this is the solution suggested by Duo (insted of "In one liter of soup, there is a lot of water." written by the title of the topic.) Is this weird only for me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingOdiny

Rocket Science!!!! Plus it's L-I-T-R-E


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/degggast

Depends on where you are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narkop___

I'm from the US and I spelled it like that subconsciously, lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitnadia

Does one ever say "multa da ..."? If not, why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MailmanSpy

I think it has to do with the fact that "multe" is separated from "akvo" by "da", meaning that it can't describe the noun and therefore can't be an adjective, and adverbs pretty much describe everything else in sentences. Most likely it is acting upon the verb "estas" and expressing the degree of water there is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/santhara4

I'm confused. I got it wrong on another question for using "a" for "unu", but got it right here and for the question about bread. Am I missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hugglesaim

I still don't get what the difference between de and da is!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinAndW

Have you gone on the web version of the site to read the tips and notes? I can't explain it better than it is said there, because that's all I know, too! If you're still confused, I bet you'll have more luck if you ask a specific question, those are more likely to be answered in my experience. I know that this is an old-ish comment and you've probably figured it out, but I'm still answering in case other people have the same question


[deactivated user]

    "Multe da akvo" doesn't make sense grammatically..."multe" is not a quantity, as in a "glass of water" or "a litre of soup"...it's an adverb...it's like saying "much of water" in English. It should just be "multe akvo"...or "multo da akvo".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uU6E3

    Making a stretch parallels between different languages is not always applicable. For instance, I could say, that in my native russian adverbs showing the number of smth, such as much, many, few, little - they all needs genitive which is expressed with preposition da and de in the Esperanto. So, from russian point of view, this construction is correct and natural. Also in english some quantity adverbs, like lots and a lot, are used with genitive preposition "of" too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uU6E3

    *straight, of course, not stretch.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beatricebenedick

    "In a liter of soup is lots of water"- should it not be 'a lot of water'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiger8255

    "a lot of water" and "lots of water" are both correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tracy906994

    Why not "multa"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MailmanSpy

    I think it has to do with the fact that "multe" is separated from "akvo" by "da", meaning that it can't describe the noun and therefore can't be an adjective, and adverbs pretty much describe everything else in sentences. Most likely it is acting upon the verb "estas" and expressing the degree of water there is.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerettferett

    ...da akvo... Is a preposition and adverbs describe prepositions, not adjectives. The -e ending makes a word an adverb. I hope this makes sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philhuebbers

    Liter is French for "Give me a f***ing Cola!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzumiR

    Why not liter ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nevetsjy

    Litre ❤❤❤❤❤❤!

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