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  5. "Den er nok hjemme."

"Den er nok hjemme."

Translation:It is probably at home.

August 16, 2015

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauliusOle

How does "enough" suddenly mean "probably"? I'm confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 180

'nok' can translate to both, depending on the context. For instance, this does not translate to "It is enough at home".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tod_Death

What would "It is enough at home" be? "Det er nok av dem hjemme"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 180

"Det er nok (av det) hjemme" would work :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris.rapson

"Den" is inaudible on the slow audio here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VengerR

What if you wanted to say "It is probably enough" Could you say "Det er nok nok"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
Mod
  • 2203

Who's there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
Mod
  • 2203

Kidding aside, a Google search of, Det er nok nok returned 183 hits. A Google search of, Det er sannsynligvis nok returned 935 results. I'd probably go with the latter, but that's just me (there are other options, too). :0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VengerR

Haha! Tusen takk :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurentMontesi

Den? Why not det?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

Presumably, the sentence is referring to a masculine or feminine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewReturn

Thinking about the German 'noch': can't it mean "It is still at home"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

No, it doesn't have that meaning in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/riridusud

Then can we use Holder and Nok at any time ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natkoba

Always coming back to comments on this one. What does the sentence mean anyway? A masculine noun, some inanimate object that was left at home?

Why "it's probably home" isn't even more preferred translation, not only wrong? Can it include nouns like hund in this den meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
Mod
  • 2203

I see "den" in this sentence is as a non-living object, such as a key or a wallet. If people were talking about their pet or any family member, it's unlikely they'd refer to them as "it" or "that."
A: Fido was missing for two days.
B: He's probably home now.
A: My wife said she'd be out all afternoon.
B: She's probably home now.

Non-living objects require the preposition "at," e.g., "My key is probably at home."

The sentence, "It's probably home," sounds like someone opining about some kind of structure, or even a cave, e.g.,
A: Where do we sleep?
B: They said there was a cabin somewhere around here.
A: What do you think that is? (Pointing at a hovel.)
B: That's probably home.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natkoba

Thanks. Sure, what I though, and as always from your explanations, it makes sense :) It's really hard to guess the right translation meaning though without the context for a perfectionist like me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
Mod
  • 2203

But, being a perfectionist, just think how well you'll speak and understand Norwegian in the end! :0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franklynfernando

What is the context of this statement?

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