"She wears an orange dress."

Translation:Caitheann sí gúna oráiste.

August 17, 2015

29 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaos97

Ive been doing this excersice almost daily for weeks, to build points to advance ranks & ive never seen the word 'flannbhui' before. Its always been oraiste. Seems so strange


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

It's a trick. The real purpose of Duolingo is to teach you stuff that you don't already know. The points and ranks are just there to keep you distracted so that they can slip in some knowledge when you're not paying attention.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolasTamashi

Yes, I use Duolingo to teach me. Not to play "tricks" or prank me with something I couldn't possibly know. Sorry, but I don't believe for a second that this was intended. It does not follow the pattern of how any words have been introduced so far.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Molossoidea

Through using the knowledge you already have you can guess the right thing and learn it. That's how learning languages in the real world works. You did the same thing when you learned your mother tongue as a child.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolasTamashi

I asked a native Irishman what "flannbui" means, and he had no idea. I then explained the context, and he said he had NEVER heard it used in place of oraiste, and thought someone was pulling my leg.

EDIT: If you don't believe me, try Googling it, then compare it to the results of Goggling "Oraiste". I'd be willing to bet the only people that think "flannbui" means orange are people that've taken this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxwellPos4

Could it be that this word was used before European people discovered oranges.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joanmvanore

It helps me not to think of the goal as getting all the answers right, but learning new stuff .... If I thought I had to get them right on the first go (or even the 20th), I'd've gone mad by now. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mtvd4

You should already know that "bui" means yellow so you can clearly guess that this word means "orange". Btw its written in the "Colours" tips card that you should try to guess what combined adjectives describing colours mean by using your imagination.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolasTamashi

Yeah, "bui" means yellow, but "flann" doesn't mean red, so, why would I assume "flannbui" has anything to do with orange?

Also, I asked a native Irishman what "flannbui" means, and he had no idea. I then explained the context, and he said he had NEVER heard it used in place of oraiste, and thought someone was pulling my leg.

EDIT: If you don't believe me, try Googling it, then compare it to the results of Goggling "Oraiste". I'd be willing to bet the only people that think "flannbui" means orange are people that've taken this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Molossoidea

Actually I found flannbhuí in an english Irish dictionary (Google Books Search) as well as flann in Wiktionary where flannbhuí is mentioned. (Flan being blood red)

As for someone not knowing the word: people in Bern have a lot of different words that people from Zuerich do not know in Switzerland. Doesn't mean those words aren't real. The way the words are introduced here I still like, you might not like it, but using logic it is totally possible and similar how to we learn languages naturally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conor697532

I saw the other two choices were wrong then guessed flannbuí because flan can be an orangey-yellow colour!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zan516131

Maybe 'Flaming yellow' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Djo456

Blood yellow = flannbhui


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richiepopeye1

There is something like that in English, strawberry-blonde. Not blonde, not red. Further, red heads are not red; they are ginger or copper but never orange. Furthermore, stem ginger is the colour that could be discribed as strawberry-blonde.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah983058

Why can't it be "Caitheann sí oráiste gúna"? Anyone got any resources on word order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langdinish

The adjective goes after the noun in Irish, as far as I know. So as opposite to English that would say "an orange dress" in Irish it goes as "gúna oráiste"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corrie805069

can anyone explain the difference between oráiste and flannbhuí? Are they interchangeable word for orange or do they refer to different shades of orange like a yellow orange vs a red orange?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Oráiste is the name of the fruit, and, as in English, has become the name of the colour associated with the fruit. Flannbhuí is an older term - it is the term used in the Irish Constitution to specify the colours of the Irish tricolour, for instance. But flannbhuí doesn't occur in Dinneen's 1904 dictionary - he includes "orange" as a translation for órdha (golden, now spelled órga) and ruadh-bhuidhe (red-yellow, now rua-buí).

de Bhaldraithe's 1959 English Irish Dictionary translates the noun "orange" as oráiste but the colour as flannbhuí. Ó Dónall includes "Dath oráiste - orange colour" in his 1977 Foclóir Gaeilge Béarla.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corrie805069

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joanmvanore

"Caitheann sí gúna ispín" made me think of Lady Gaga. I suppose that'd be "gúna feoil," though ....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadine647031

Caitheann sí gúna oráiste would be right surely?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Caitheann sí gúna oráiste and Caitheann sí gúna flannbhuí are both correct. If you are typing the answer out, either answer will be accepted. If you are picking the words from a list, you have to choose a word on the list - if flannbhuí is on the list and oráiste isn't, then they answer will be Caitheann sí gúna flannbhuí.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freetof

What about orioste?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

"orioste" isn't a word in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meuIin

ive been learning irish for 10 years in school and never seen fhlannbhuí before ? only ever oráiste. very confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnVaugha15

I went to school with and for 25 years worked with some native speakers from Connemara and they never heard of it either. I would understand if I saw a word like “fuilbhuí”as kind of blood_red yellow (if you mix those colours you get orange) but not flanbhuí. The Connemara people say óraiste!


[deactivated user]

    Poor Dev must be spinning in his grave.

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