1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Tógann an fear an foirgneamh…

"Tógann an fear an foirgneamh."

Translation:The man builds the building.

August 18, 2015

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John365571

Takes the building! as in a hostage situation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoreenPrimrose

Probably not very good English, but what is wrong with 'the man takes the building'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexinIreland

Nothing :) It's perfectly grammatical and is a correct translation (no matter how silly it might seem in an everyday context...). I've added it as an alternative. Thank you :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

That probably wasn't a good idea, as it will hinder learners who don't know that "tóg" has more than one meaning.

Duolingo lessons aren't just tests of what you already know, they're also the primary way of teaching new knowledge. If "tógann" isn't shown as "build" in exercises where that's a far more sensible translation, then the lesson is failing the student.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris804944

Tógann = takes / builds / lifts ???? My mind is shattered!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryGallagher71

English has a lot of these also:

Rook - a bird; to steal
Flag - a banner; to tire;
Wake - to come out of sleep; a swath left when something has passed through water
Left - the opposite of right; something not needed
Hail - ice balls; homage to someone
Deck - a porch; a punch to the face

Granted, a lot of these English words change from noun to verb and so forth, but I imagine the Irish language has many such words with multiple meanings. Don't give up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pianoician

Bygmaster Finnegan?

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.