"Do que eles são feitos?"

Translation:What are they made of?

October 24, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro242425

I miss the correct long version "Do que é que eles são feitos?" But I am not expecting anyone to say this anymore

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/damarx

You could understand it in English as something like: "what is it that they are made of?"

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/birdmanbill

More correctly, the translation might be 'of what is it that they are made?' However, I agree that this would rarely be used these days, especially when spoken rather than written. Interesting, though, that the original portuguese sentence retains this structure.

March 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

In written English, the highly formal version would be "Of what are they made?"

January 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/POLSKAdoBOJU

How do you know if a past participle requires ser or estar?

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkosGoulet

The hints say that "feitos" means "deeds", "feats" and "likes". So this sentence must have some kind of expression. What is it?

October 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalocaris

"Feito" is also the past participle of "fazer", "to make", so it means "made" just like in English. http://www.conjuga-me.net/verbo-fazer The hints can be really misleading sometimes.

October 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkosGoulet

Yes, I realized that after posting my question. Those hints can be very confusing. I had learned yesterday that past participles can be pluralized. This sentence's structure is preposition - question word - plural pronoun - auxiliary verb - plural past participle.

October 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller

If you look closely, "deeds" are the actions made by a great man. Did you notice the "made"?

That's a form of sentence in which we transform the adjective into a noun: "Seus feitos são grandes" = "His deeds are great"

October 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnR93

Does this sentence refer to people in a metaphorical sense, as well as objects in a physical sense? In English, we say what someone is made of as a way to express their character. With regard to objects, it would simply be their physical composition.

August 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/damarx

Yes, a participle used with the verbs "ser", "estar" and other linking verbs will change according to the noun it refers to: "a palavra foi dita" (the word was said). But with the verb "ter", the participle is invariable: "ela tinha dito" (she had said).

January 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PetoG

Yes, these participles are very similar to adjectives. Makes also semantic sense, they describe properties more than actions/activities, so it also makes sense to apply the same rules for them (inflection).

December 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

yes, feito has more than one single meaning.

October 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Dayan494708

In this case it means "to be made of" like bread is made of flour

August 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveBoltman

"They are made of what?" should probably also be accepted

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/barbaratorrance

i would say " what are they made from" this may be a little old fashion!

May 11, 2019
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