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  5. "Wer gewinnt im Fußball?"

"Wer gewinnt im Fußball?"

Translation:Who is winning in soccer?

January 1, 2013

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnie_19

Fußball should translate as football. No one in the UK talks about soccer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orbwizard

Football is also accepted as an answer, and I don't think this course is only for people in the UK…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

Or in Europe, Africa, Latin America, Asia, Oceania…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zalivstok

In Australia it's soccer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomanJonte

Probably to distinct it with american/gaelic/australian one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomk123

Surely keeping the definite article that is in the German makes more sense that dropping it. It can have the meaning of referring to football match, whereas leaving it out is too vague.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siebolt

No, in that case there would have been :"Wer gewinnt das Fußballspiel?" Think of the Olympics. It is not unknown that countries have a certain rivality, counting the amount of medals etc. So one country is good at swimming. the other is not bad at swimming, but better at soccer. In this situation I can easily imagine the question: Wer gewinnt im Fußball?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mulebeatsdrums

As a native British English speaker, I would leave the definite article in ("who's winning the football?", "who's winning in the football?"). Leaving it out doesn't sound natural to me. At a push, maybe "who's winning at football?" sounds okay but I think that's an American turn of phrase and I can't imagine a situation in which I'd use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulCole11

The model answer "Who is winning in soccer" is appalling English. "Who is winning (in) the football" sounds far better .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorganOwen8

It's not though, at least for American-English. "Who is winning in soccer" would be a perfectly normal question someone would ask in America, albeit that they probably don't know whos playing so it may sound a little funny. Also when talking about American Football, we would still say "Who is winning in football?" Though generally people just ask "Who's winning" since the game in question would usually be implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mulebeatsdrums

I'm really intrigued by this. To reiterate my reply on another comment here, I'm a British English native speaker, and leaving out the "the" almost always sounds wrong. Yet another instance of two countries separated by a common language. (NB we too would usually just say "who's winning?" unless the sport at play was ambiguous)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NitaWest1

Yes, or "Who's winning the match?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mulebeatsdrums

I'm really intrigued by this. To reiterate my reply on another comment here, I'm a British English native speaker, and leaving out the "the" almost always sounds wrong. Yet another instance of two countries separated by a common language. (NB we too would usually just say "who's winning?" unless the sport at play was ambiguous)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Treacle18

Aussue here, and I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bens1986

Really clunky sentence in English.

Who is winning in football?

Wouldn't "who is winning the football?" be better? (Which could equally mean the football match, league or tournament)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GRFk9

Or even "Who's winning at football?" Never "in".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelUare

And who cares???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/logitecy

My heart bleeds each time I see "soccer" meaning football


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin_Peter

Germany would be a safe bet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Piotr_2020

Soccer? Are we all Americans? Guys, it's football.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.A.Boraie

Natürlich Bayern München , Stern des Südens .. !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrisbrown2013

As football is a game where players predominantly use there feet to move the ball, can't we have the English translation of football ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan432846

To me two glaring obvious issues with this sentence, 'in' should be 'the' and 'soccer' should be football!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jose_Pamon

Football is a simple game: 22 men chase a ball for 90 minutes and, in the end, the Germans always win.

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