"Et eget rom"

Translation:A room of one's own

August 19, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JegHeterJule

I'm not a native English speaker; the English translation sounds a bit weird to me. Is it really correct English, tough? I really had a hard time to figure out this one, even in my mother tongue (which is French).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

Yes, it's correct English but it's very formal. It would be more common to say 'your own room' or something of that nature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louise_the_Lotus

"One's own room" is correct as well, and may work better for foreigners. I personally say it this way anyways, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/londoncallling

It's the title of a famous book by Virginia Woolf.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

It's best to assume that unfamiliar structures in foreign languages are ones that you have not yet learnt rather than incorrect ones. "Of one's own" is extremely common and entirely standard in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JegHeterJule

I did not assumed it was wrong, I was just wondering if it was, since I speak Enligh for almost 10 years now and I have never seen it, even though I read a lot in English in the last 3 years. That's why I asked if it was indeed correct. My English is getting better because of the Norwegian course, so I kind of have a 2 for 1 deal. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satyrbuddy

You say that but, as a native English speaker in America, its not a sentence I would ever use unless I'm trying to be comically formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johndelaroo

My feeling is that any sentence with "one" in it, meaning some un-named person, is 19th century upper or middle class English from England. I understand it and use it when I want to be a little pompous. "My own room" or "Her own room" etc would be much more common in speech one thinks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

I would somewhat disagree. As a native speaker, I would agree that using the "one" structure to mean an impersonal subject sounds slightly more formal or proper, but in no way does it sound archaic, old, pompous or specifically British. It's very normal, just slightly higher in register than the alternatives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

En kvinne må har penger og et eget rom hvis ho vil skrive skjønnlitteratur. (Sorry, if I butchered my translation)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 487

"Ho" is nynorsk (or dialect), "har" needs to be "ha", and I think I'd substitute "vil" with "skal".

The rest is perfect. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

Oh! I live in the North so I never know whether the words I pick up are Bokmål or Northern Dialect. Should I have said 'hun' instead of 'ho'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 487

Yes, at least when your aim is to write bokmål. For text messages etc. it's quite common to write in dialect, especially if the recipient shares that same dialect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachel.hsi

Yess!!! Good book


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyWalker14

Sick Virginia woolf reference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 487

You could say "ens eget rom", but there exists no possessive form of "man".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tec58

a separate room skulle også godkjennes, da vi bruker det for å presisere et rom satt av til spesielle aktiviteter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YifanXiong

I typed one's own room, and it is recognised.

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