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https://www.duolingo.com/TTANTAWY

Graduating from Duolingo

TTANTAWY
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I was thinking about this for a while now: so what's next? When would you consider yourself 'done' in a language? Duolingo-wise, at least. I'm aware that you can't 'finish' learning any given language including your own mother tongue, but what I mean is: don't you feel like there should be a sort of graduating test to gauge your knowledge after you've reached maximum level? I'm not talking about certificates here, I'm talking about a final exam after which words and skills stop decaying and you can go learn another language or move on to even higher levels/upper intermediate stuff. Nous avons besoin d'aller au-delĂ ., non? :D

Please, do tell me your thoughts.

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cminardi
cminardi
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I don't mean to put down duolingo, but I think that you need to think outside the box if want to get really good at any language. I would hope that after learning all you can from duolingo, you should be at a point where you can continue improving on your own, whether that means reading more complicated materials in the language, listening to the radio, studying more advanced grammar, watching t.v/movies, talking to native speakers, etc. I think the path to true fluency depends a lot more on your motivation and desire to learn, regardless of the tools you choose to use, rather than on the tools themselves.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

Hopefully the Duolingo staff will always keep on adding lessons and new words to the skill trees that are already in "Phase 3" so that you'll never be able to take a "final exam" because the tree itself will never be a final tree.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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For now there is not much you can do except practice , use immersion , and have discussions indefinitely. In the future, I suppose there will be advanced lessons, at least the staff has hinted. I also believe they will include new games or challenges.

You can also try doing the reverse of whatever language you've learnt. For now, pat yourself on the back, dive into immersion, and help others to complete their languages using the discussion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whirrun

I think you should only be using it as a supplementary tool. You're only done with it when you don't want to speak the language anymore.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porquepuedo
porquepuedo
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Once you finish Duolingo and everything you have learned is stuck in your head... well, it's a big world out there. Where do you go next? From all the warmth and friendliness of everyone here... do you go straight to a place where that language is spoken, do you search madly for somewhere you can learn even more? This makes me... almost, well, sad. I am frightfully close to completing my Spanish skill tree and I've only been using Duolingo for about two months. I love it here, where everyone answers my questions and is kind... and respects that I'm not perfect at everything... is there even another site or place quite like this? Most likely not. My advice to you all - stay here, keep practicing. You will never be perfect at a language that is not your own, and you will also never be able to find a place like this one. Stay here on Duolingo, but dig deep for a way to find more - whether it's a chat where you talk with other speakers of the language you're learning, or whether you spend hours on end translating articles in the Immersion section. Graduating from Duolingo would be hard for everyone, really... so don't do it ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
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I'm not sure why we'd need a final test -- every single Duolingo lesson is a test, so Duolingo already has a better idea of your skill level than any single test could provide!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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True, but there are concepts you don't practice often that you may have forgotten or not. For example, I haven't seen some of the animals I have learnt being used in the lessons for quite some time.

As I indicated in a previous discussion, this would serve as an excellent way to give me a wake up call, and quickly deteriorate all the skills I have yet to master(but think I did). Since, the individual has already completed the lessons, and has no more challenges, this can serve as a way to go back and find area where you are weak. Of course resetting a language, taking the placement test, and starting from from scratch would have a similar effect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anonyduck

I was expecting to acquire new vocab and idioms by doing immersion once I finished the tree. Perhaps also, users will make vocab packs for the incubator pertaining to their specialities (hobbies, professions, areas of expertise)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Preusser

You are far enough along that you'll have no trouble finding a boatload of material on virtually any subject that interests you. That and a decent dictionary app. (e.g. Dict.cc and Pons are personal favorites) and you can use recreational reading to develop your vocabulary as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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Indeed, though I wish I had a source for grade 1 like texts. This way, I can gradually read stories without consulting so much of a dictionary. Duolingo claims I can read about 90% of the text, I wish I could test that assertion with an appropriate text.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amslucy

Yeah, 90% seems a bit high. One thing that you might try is reading a chapter book for children (something geared towards 8-12 year olds). You'll have to look up a LOT of words in the beginning, but the advantage to reading a longer book by one author is that they tend to reuse a lot of the same vocabulary. So it gets a lot easier after the first few chapters.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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Indeed, I'm currently rummaging the net looking for proficiency-appropriate books. I guess, I'm probably at the proficiency level of around 4-8 year old in French.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IAmJon
IAmJon
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It is strange, i don't really want to complete a skill tree. Because i get the feeling that i may stop learning. I will feel i have completed the game, I like learning but i'm not sure what the step after Duo would be. My small city in the UK doesn't really have French speakers hanging around (although some will exist, probably students, there a lots of Chinese and Polish speakers though). There aren't really any French classes either. I can read stuff online i guess. I will probably hang around to complete German and then maybe Italian or one of the many future Incubator languages.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TTANTAWY
TTANTAWY
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What I'm trying to say is: shouldn't the skills stop decaying over time at some point? Whatever that point is?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cminardi
cminardi
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If you want to keep using duolingo as your only way to learn, I think they should not stop decaying. As far as I am concerned, I am always forgetting an re-learning my languages, so having your skills decay consistently is reasonable. You can probably get to a proficiency point where most of what you learned through duolingo becomes really solid knowledge, but if that's the case, why would you care if the skills decay or not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
Dessamator
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It is psychological, I may want a perky beautiful golden tree. It is the reason perhaps I may hesitate before resetting a language I have conquered even after I complete a course. The thought of losing all that virtual progress seems to be disheartening to some people.

On topic, I believe that current algorithm won't allow skills to stop decaying, they may decay slowly, but they will never stop decaying. Unless maybe you go to the vocabulary section, and click "I know this word" for all words you believe you have mastered.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IG88
IG88
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I don't think there should be a "final exam", but I do agree that users should have the option to freeze decay once they've finished a course. I also don't like the way that you lose your owl when new lessons are added. I briefly lost mine for Spanish when they updated the tree a while ago and even though it wasn't a huge deal to get it back, since I still practice Spanish here, I really think once you've put in all the hours to earn your owl you should never lose it. I might not keep practicing French or Portuguese as much as I have Spanish when I finish those courses, and I would hate to eventually lose my owls for them (if I earn them) the same way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skylanderB2

hi

1 year ago