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"Él se ha sentido bien."

Translation:He has felt well.

4 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gozde.koks

Where did that se come from? Is there a rule i've forgotten?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carnaedy
CarnaedyPlus
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"Sentir" is a transitive verb, which means that it requires an object. This is different from English, where "to feel" can also be intransitive, that is, object is not necessary.

In a more mundane language, "sentir" means "to feel something", or "to touch something". If you want to speak about your own feelings, that requires using a reflexive form "sentirse".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliNka

So if I use the same sentence but talking about myself, would it be:

Me ha sentido bien. ?

If "you":

Te has sentido bien.

Or I don't need "me" and "te"?

Ha sentido bien. Has sentido bien.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carnaedy
CarnaedyPlus
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Yes, you do need the reflexive me and te, so "Me he sentido bien", "Te has sentido bien".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliNka

Thank you, Carnaedy!

Would it be the same with other reflexive verbs? For eg.:

Me he despertado. Te has afeitado.

?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carnaedy
CarnaedyPlus
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Yes, any verb you find given in the dictionary as "-arse", "-erse" or "-irse" necessarily uses a reflexive pronoun, appropriately matching its subject, as its object in all of its forms.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/popa910
popa910
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I don't know if this is true for the verb "sentir", but if you omit the reflexive "me/te/le/nos/les" for some verbs, they are still valid sentences, but their meaning will change. E.g.:

"Me lo he ganado." -> "I have earned it." "Lo he ganado." -> "I have won it."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

Why se though why not lo and why is it transitive and what is intransitive

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Verb is reflexive, so pronoun "se" (3rd person singular) is needed. Además, He has been well. That answer should also be acceptable. to be well = to feel well in venacular English DL, no doubt, will not accept that or change its official more literal answer. Sentirse is programmed a certain way in the computer, and it will take a sea change to affect that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bega1
bega1
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he=él + has felt= se ha sentido+ well........ we agree ...the 3rd person is needed

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gozde.koks

Despite my typo you're a teacher? We agree!?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/picadilly
picadilly
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Is this the same as "He has been feeling well." ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carnaedy
CarnaedyPlus
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This is actually more of a question about English grammar. Do you think "I feel well" and "I am feeling well" mean the same thing? They kind of do, but one is merely an observation of the current state, while the second emphasizes the progressive nature of the feeling, I am still in the state of feeling well, it is an ongoing feeling.

Despite that, Alejandro is also correct in a sense: progressive tenses are really rare in Spanish, compared to English (you use them only if you really really want to emphasize the progressiveness of the action), and perfect progressive tenses even more so (to the point of sounding really awkward), so you would probably just revert to normal perfect anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TageChr

It shouldn't cause trouble to understand the words of a sentence, here is how I sort it out: E´l (he, the doer) se (to himself, the object) ha sentido (he has felt, reflects to himself) bien (well). I suppose my fiends in UK 30 odd years ago would put 'all right' not 'well'

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

actually we would just say, "i feel fine." ;-) Nobody SAYS well, but of course, it is a real word, and is used in written English.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandroR666
AlejandroR666
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That would be Él se ha estado sintiendo bien... but sounds akward. So yes, it is the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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But does it sound as awkward as "He has felt well" does in English??

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajar
tajar
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He has felt well is just clunky English. You could say 'Over the course of his life, he has felt well more than he has felt poorly' but that's not what we're given.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I don't see what is clunky about it tajar. We might say: "Él se ha sentido bien así durante dos días, pero las pruebas son todavía concluyentes. Podría ser otro mes antes de que estemos seguro de que se cura."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajar
tajar
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Yes, indeed, you could say that; but it's quite outside the scope of the original sentence which still seems clunky. One of the things we were taught in conference interpreters' school, was that a thought should be rendered accurately and gracefully into the target language. So now you understand my hypersensitivity.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuvasz1986

I agree that it's not natural. You could say "He has felt well recently", "Since his operation, he has felt well" or "He has felt well for the last few weeks", but without the qualifier it sounds awkward.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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No those three examples are equally unnatural to this native English speaker. I would render them all "... has been feeling well ..."

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmendonca007

What tense would be "He had felt well?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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It's called the past perfect. Here's a link.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/great-kanahawa

is this the correct answer he felt good

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I think that's what we'd say in American English. I put "well" because I didn't want to get it wrong and have to repeat the module if I got other things wrong. DL seems to prefer "well" for "bien" and "good" for "bueno/a"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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Actually, the same goes for Australian English. I had only thought of "He had been feeling well" because "He had felt well" sounds very wrong to me. But now that I see it "He felt good" sound like perfectly natural English too.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Don't forget, for learning purposes it is important to stay in the same tense.
In this case these two tenses have distinct meanings.

se ha sentido bien - has felt well (present perfect)
se sentido bien- felt well (past)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/...alrighty

why does "he felt well" not work for the translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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See HERE and you'll see that "he felt well" is preterite "el sintío".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/...alrighty

ah i see, thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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De nada, elocord. I'm happy to help, and every answer is valuable revision for me, so thank you for the question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Francesca92441

Surely should have felt better not well

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

se ha sentido bien - has felt well
se ha sentido mejor - has felt better

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jumcbee

I answered incorrectly, but the correction offered by Duolingo is this absurd answer.... "He is felt well."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marris42
Marris42
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I accidentally wrote "he is felt well" as the English translation but it said it was correct with no problems.. Not sure if there's a way to report that that I can't see?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileenGonz14

You have an option to report it, when it shows up incorrect, you should see a red flag, click on the red flag, and then your options should appear from there.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gozde.koks

Couldn't have been more doen to earth. We totally agree!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bega1
bega1
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we are very well studying and need much practice..... the practice is all... we will learning a new language. I am happy meet you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1920SJJ

Why at the beginning lesson word list do you list the spelling sentida?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I translated to: "He has heard it well". Is this wrong?
Yes, I know "heard" can be oído, but sentir can mean "to hear" too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

"Sentir" can translate to: feel , sense , regret , be sorry , be sorry to

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I still think I'm right and so does WordReference HERE:
sentir⇒ vtr (percibir por los sentidos)
(sensation) feel vtr
(general) sense vtr
(sound) hear vtr
(flavor) taste vtr

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Maybe I should have been more circumspect about what I said. I can look up words in the dictionary and that is OK as far as it goes, but it doesn't tell me whether the meaning of the word is in common usage.

I've been thinking about the difference between hear and listen. I can put the radio on in the workshop. I can hear it but I'm not listening to it because I'm busy doing something else. In fact there should be a word between these two. For example, a comment may catch my ear that prompts me to check the news. The best word I can think of for that is monitoring.

I think hear would be oír and listen would be escuchar.
There is a Spanish verb monitorear, but is this specific only to Latin America?
I guess we would only use sentir in this case if the sense used had already been established as hearing.

Comments please.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Well, it looks like you are onto it. I just checked, "to hear" and the result is: "para escuchar"

Verb: oír , escuchar , saber , ver , sentir , entender , asistir

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMitche3

Is se needed?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Start at the top of the page and you will quickly find several excellent explanations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HomesickTourist

Please correct me if I am wrong. I wanted to make everything clear for anyone.

If I was talking about myself it would be; Me he sentido bien.

When someone else is reporting this; El se ha sentido bien

And if above sentences were questioning sentences nothing would change only there would be question marks.

And If the sentence to be translated was He has felt it well. Then the translation would be lo ha sentido bien.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGaromine

Donate a lingot or you'll never win another game of fortnite ever

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EileenGonz14

He has been feeling well.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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This is not natural English. That's how I translated it literally in my head but the closest natural English I could come up with was "He has been feeling well" but that was marked wrong.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

Natural sounding sentences and Duolingo are not on speaking terms.
It can be frustrating but you will get used to it.

Your benefit from Duolingo will increase if you focus on what they are trying to teach in each sentence.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

I don't understand why this and some other sentences have "se" in them. Anybody? Wouldn't it say the exact same thing without the "se"?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

CelesteSon,
The top thread on this discussion already has some explanations on reflexive verbs.
Feel free to find the explanation there.

Also, here is a helpful link:
https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/reflexive1

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesBradl207664

I wrote, he has felt better and was marked wrong

6 months ago