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  5. "Er hestene trøtte?"

"Er hestene trøtte?"

Translation:Are the horses sleepy?

August 24, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bodwisteve

has anyone ever seen a horse yawn?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fool444luv

No, but I have to say that I find this method of teaching surprisingly helpful....to pair a word that you might confuse because of your native tongue with the very thing you would confuse it with is actually a GREAT mnemonic device for me...the weirdness of it sort of jolts your brain into paying better attention and thus.....remembering!!!....:)..brilliant!!!......I never encountered this as I recall in my Spanish and German studies in high school and college, and so, I don't know if this is a common device used in the "world of language learning" or just a Duolingo thing...but it's smart!!.... or maybe it's just a Norwegian thing....and if so, Norwegians are smart!! :) ...and now thanks to allintolearning's comment/question I also know the ACTUAL Norwegian word for trotting!!!...AWESOME!!!....Marry me Duolingo! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaivikThan

Ok, so in English, as there is a definite but subtle difference between sleepy and tired, is this present in norsk? If so, what is the word for sleepy and what is the word for tired?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

trøtt = sleepy, tired (mostly in the sense of sleepy, but some use it more broadly)
sliten = tired (physically or mentally)
lei = tired (mostly in the sense of being tired of something)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

This was exactly the question I had (although I feel there is more than just a "subtle difference" between sleepy and tired). Anyway, this is exactly the answer I was looking for. Tusen takk, Deliciae!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

So now, I had to find out how to say "Are the horses trotting?" but it seems to be "Er hestene traver?" (No, that is not right, see below) I find it helpful to know what a similar looking word would be to help me not mix them up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Traver hestene?"

No present continuous, remember. If you're looking for the present participle, then that's "travende".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Thank you! Ah, so, "Do the horses trot?" is "Traver hestene?" I should have kept it in the same tense! Can you say "Er hestene travende?" or would you ever do that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, that would be the translation of both "Do the horses trot?" and "Are the horses trotting?".

We wouldn't say "Er hestene travende?" - though it's technically possible. You could, however, refer to "trotting horses" as "travende hester".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe109937

So NOW, I had to find out how to say "Are the horses traveling?"... and THEN I had to find out... well, I was hoping for a closed loop of horse actions, but alas...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

A closed loop of horse actions is called a "race track".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeg.Heter.Colin

ok what is the difference between trøtte and trøtt? i am sure there was another question where trøtt was correct instead of the former. help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

We use "trøtte" here because "hestene" is plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeg.Heter.Colin

yes me too. i thought horses are just supposed to work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christinaaalvik

Trøtt = tired søvnig = sleepy

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