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  5. "Kimya bölümüne başvuru yaptı…

"Kimya bölümüne başvuru yaptım."

Translation:I applied to the department of chemistry.

August 25, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joklomo

Is the whole verb: başvuru yapmak (to apply)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, "to make an application" = "to apply".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabineBergmann1

but "I made an application....." is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjp123456

'I made an applicatıon' was marked wrong. 'başvuru yaptım' means 'I made an application'.You have previously commented below that "to make an application" doesn't really make sense in English'. I entirely disagree, and believe a correction is required.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

The Department of Chemistries in the Ministry of Tragic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragan17a

Couldn't this also be "I study Chemestrry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Nope, this is specifically talking about applying to a department at a university to see if you can get in. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikRempe

bölüm = department, bölümün = department of, bölümüne = to the department of. Correct? Why is it not kimyanın as in of chemistry or chemistry's?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"its department" is "bölümü"; the -n- is a buffer consonant between the possessive ending and the case ending. ("Bölümün" would be genitive case, "department's", not possessive, "its department".)

Another way of saying it in English is "the chemistry department" -- perhaps this makes it clearer that this is not a (fully) possessive construction but more of a noun-noun compound.

I suppose kimyanın bölümü might be "the department of the chemistry".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjp123456

I made an application to the department of chemıstry - was marked wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

"to make an application" doesn't really make sense in English (or at least American English). It would just mean that you are physically typing up a form for people to fill out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/londoncallling

It makes sense in British English! I don't understand why this course is so insistent on only accepting American English all the time. None of the other Duo courses are like that. It makes it doubly difficult for anyone who isn't American because we have to remember not just the Turkish, which is hard enough, but also the American phrasing. How hard would it be to just approve alternative translations???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trivialstuff

It does make sense.

  1. Longman Dictionary specifically includes "make an application" in its collocation box. https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/application

  2. "Make an application" shows up twice in Oxford Dictionaries' example sentences. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/application


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HamishCJ

I know (or at least think) that Turkish doesn't have perfect tenses, but is "I have applied to the department of chemistry." an incorrect translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabineBergmann1

As to my knowledge your sentence should be accepted. Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaKress1

I am a native American speaker and I would say "I am making an application to the chemistry department".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EduardoBer912643

The verb in Turkish is in the past tense. Native American? Do you mean you speak Cherokee? Just a joke.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldLeBeau

It would seem to me that 'to apply' and 'to make an application' are synonymous and both should be accepted. Maybe I have not remembered correctly, but I though 'made an application' was used in a previous example...as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

In Turkish, would this mean you are applying to be a student, or a teacher, or both?

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