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dearer or more expensive?

I mentioned earlier on that Duolingo does not accept "dearer" for "more expensive". I did not intend to dwell on it and deleted the discussion too soon. Here is an example of the use of "dearer" in the sense of "more expensive" from Longmans dictionary.

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/dear_3

2 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Duolingo tends to accept more American English. More expensive is what would be used in the United States. However, you can report it if it's not accepting British English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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I've heard "that's too dear" but never "dearer"; not to say it isn't used, just that only remember hearing "dear".

There's a line in a song from Les Miserables where a couple is talking about a young child they took in, and they say "Little dear, cost us dear." Here it is on YouTube

Dictionary.com says dear as an adjective can mean:

\5. high-priced; expensive:
The silk dress was too dear.
6. charging high prices:
That shop is too dear for my budget.
7. excessive; high:
a dear price to pay for one's independence.

And as an adverb:

\14. at a high price:
That painting cost me dear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Every summer we can rent a cottage in the Isle of Wight if it's not too dear. We can scrimp and save......

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I searched dearer via Google News and found several examples.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Dearer is fine. In both senses.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karpathian
Karpathian
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Rest assured "Dearer" is used in the UK to comparatively describe something more expensive. It tends to be older generations from my experience though.

I love the line from Les Miserables. +1

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I had trouble trying to figure out what you're referring to. I never knew that dear means expensive. Apparently dear in that context is often used outside the States.

Take a look the relevant synonyms for expensive. from Thesaurus.com.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dcarl1
Dcarl1
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Even in the U.S. this is used, but more rarely. The old expression "buy cheap and sell dear," for example. It should be accepted, even if it's less common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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That's new to me. I'll start using dear as a substitute for expensive once in a while. I can't wait to see what kind of reaction I'll get.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Nice meme. I had never heard it either here in Pennsylvania until I watched an older man on tv who was from upstate New York. He said it regularly. I think it has pockets in the population where it is used.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scotchguard

Using "dear" as an expression for "expensive" is something that used to be common in the United States, but is less common now. It's gone the way of the Ford Edsel and dial telephones. So ask your grandparents, or maybe your great-grandparents and they will likely be familiar with that use of the word "dear."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Gosh, what a lousy thesaurus!

2 years ago