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"Mi kontrolu la vortojn sur tiu paĝo."

Translation:Let me check the words on that page.

August 25, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

I almost wrote "I control the words on that page".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreyEHarris

If it helps to remember the correct meaning of this “false friend”, English received the cognate in one rarely-used sense of the word “controller”—spelled “comptroller” in government contexts, but confusingly still pronounced the same as “controller”—and a controller/comptroller checks and verifies accounts, but doesn’t “control” them. Most large cities and some federal departments in the US have comptrollers, as do many other anglophone countries’ ministries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomajiAmulo

Why is it -u here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zubiz

To create the "let me" meaning. -u ending signifies imperative (do, come, check..).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solidgitarius

There's no imperative for the first person in English, or is there? To command oneself to do something doesn't make much sense. Does it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zubiz

You are right. I don't know much about the English grammar, but in some some languages it is called the volitive. In esperanto -u ending is used to indicate a command when used for non-first-person people, but it becomes the indicator of volitive mood when used for I and we.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreyEHarris

It’s why we use the stand-in causative verb “let” to translate it. “Let me…”, “allow me to…”, “permit me to…”, or (in question form) “shall I…?” all turn an Esperanto “volitive” “pronoun + verb + -u” into something that works in English grammar without changing the meaning much. English imperatives, like English infinitives, cannot take a subject. (Esperanto imperatives can, so we use “let’s” et al., and so can Esperanto infinitives—those can tend to confuse us into doing an ‘-on, kiu -[aiou]s’ when you just need ‘-o -i’, sometimes with an initial ke.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian729689

You can certainly say to yourself "Just do it!" or "Jump!" Exactly as one would order others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreyEHarris

No—those are still normal second-person imperatives. “C’mon, jump, you lazy git!”, not “jump, me/I lazy git!”. Our inner voice is talking “to ourselves”, with our inner voice being the first person, commanding ourselves, the second.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/realfoodman

The voice speaks a bit too quickly here. It's hard to tell what's being said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umdch24k

I have written: "Let me verify the words on that page." Submitted for acceptation. Ni vidu kiun okazos.

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