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https://www.duolingo.com/leemonday

Feedback, Swedish

leemonday
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You don't really seem to have a feedback section on the site, but I'm studying Swedish and I would just like to say the Tips & Notes section is incredibly disappointing. I understand the immersion process, but having to read through every discussion after a sentence is long and tedious.

My example section is the 'Prepositions' section, where many of the prepositions have ambiguous meanings, or several mean the same thing and it's difficult to discern when to use which.

The tips and notes just say 'Sometimes its like English, other times not. Good luck!' which is not helpful at all.

Does anyone know of a link that has this information, specifically for prepositions?

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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This post lists the uses of om, and seems quite comprehensive: http://www.thelocal.se/blogs/theswedishteacher/tag/prepositions/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leemonday
leemonday
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thank you for leaving a helpful reply

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
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I understand that that is not a very helpful answer, but on the other hand we can't really explain the entire use of prepositions either. It's very irregular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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There is always the option of making general statements about the usage of prepositions, and give some examples. Even in an irregular system there are certain principles, which do of course have exceptions. You can also link to other resources online. I don't think anybody requested an exhaustive listing of all usages of all prepositions - it doesn't have to be all-or-nothing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/landsend
landsend
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The tips and notes just say 'Sometimes its like English, other times not. Good luck!' which is not helpful at all.

That is true for all prepositions in all languages that I know. It is a very helpful tip as it is the only solid statement that can be made about learning prepositions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBorkBorkBork

Prepositions are just as idiomatic in English. For instance, we tend to get on the plane instead of in it. It's the same in Swedish. More than half the time the translation is pretty direct. is the most different, used in more senses than English "on". It can also mean against or touching, at (as in at work, but never when it could mean on top), and in (as in a language). Many Swedish adjectives exist as lesser used words in English (often spelt differently, but with a similar sound). Here is a list, and their English entries at Wiktionary:

apropå
angående
av
bakom
beträffande
bland
bredvid
efter
emellan
emot
enligt
framför
från
för
förbi
före
genom
hos
i
ibland
ifrån
igenom
inemot
inför
innan
innanför
inuti
jämte
kring
likt
med
medelst
mellan
mot
oavsett
om
omkring
ovan

rörande
till
tills
trots
undan
under
utan
utom
vid
å
åt
över

As you'll see, some are pretty direct translations, but others have quite a few usage notes. You can also see why Duolingo doesn't teach everything all at once. My advice would be to learn the prepositions used with things along with whether they are en or ett words. I'm still learning them myself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--Charlotte--
--Charlotte--
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Prepositions vary in every language depending on the feel of a sentence, construction, social acceptance or evolution of a language. This is the reason you need at least some degree of a knack for languages (fingertoppskänsla) and can't merely depend on the rigid rules of grammar. Language is like a liquid, it flows and changes.

I turn on the tv is just as acceptable as I turn the tv on. How does one explain this to someone learning English? Same goes for the cat jumped upon the table versus the cat jumped on the table.

I suggest finishing your Swedish tree by trial and error, paying close attention to certain sentence constructions. Meanwhile, try reading and listening to Swedish as much as you can.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheSlavLad
TheSlavLad
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I find Swedish notes to be helpful. Something as complex as prepositions would require all of the possible combinations in the entire language to be listed for you to be able to learn them. They're way too irregular. You just have to learn it by hearing it. Same with French. Croatian. Whatever.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlecHirsch1

Honestly, it's not even so much the lack of an explanation that bothers me so much as it is that coupled with the lack of a decent number of setences to practice on. This is by no means a problem with the moderators of the swedish course, as they don't have any control over it, but it's frustrating when i want to practice something like prepositions on duo, but i can't a) select to only practice certains words, and b) start to see the same setences over and over again, and at that point it just becomes memorization. I can talk to people sometimes, obviously, but there's just no good way to get used to using prepositions myself (apart from possibly picking it up through reading). It's just milding frustrating for me as a new language learner that there is so little on, as prepositions are by far the hardest thing I've come across yet, and I've got a feeling it will stay that way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ericthelinguist

I could not agree more! The Swedish notes section is very lacking.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leemonday
leemonday
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I'm sorry, I really am, and I love that people replied so readily, but I'm fluent in three languages before trying Duolingo and I've never come across such a vague and unhelpful section of learning as this.

I understand its idiomatic and dependent, but that's why I'm precisely asking for some kind of help. I even teach English as a foreign language and I give my students a little more basis to go off of than this.

Even by trial and error, I've noticed there are several inconsistencies with saying the prep 'to' for example. Sometimes a word works and others it doesn't, for no reason given.

My only point is that as a language service, Duolingo could do a bit better in functioning as a teaching device in manners other than simple immersion; not every one functions at an immersion level and some of us like explanation. If someone asked me the differences of the English prepositions, as is my job, I'd be happy to oblige because I view it as a function of language accuracy, which helps fluency.

3 years ago