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"Dek, cent, mil, miliono, miliardo"

Translation:Ten, a hundred, a thousand, a million, a billion

3 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ErnestoPerales

if 1,000,000 is 'miliono', then 1/1,000,000 is a 'milionono'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanTelloM
AlanTelloM
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Yes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khedican

Good question, i was also wondering.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonVillines

In Esperanto, the commas and periods are switched. That number is 1.000.000, not the other way around.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomicxo

Only partially. In Esperanto the decimal marker is "," (comma) rather than "." (full stop), but the thousands separator is a non-breaking space rather than either of them. This is in line with the SI (Système International) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) rules for language-neutral numbers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Williams_Dakota

So one million point five would be 1000000.5?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomicxo

1 000 000,5

See the Wikipedia article if you would like to read the history of it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikesjg
mikesjg
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which billion Im british but I know duolingo uses the american flag for english

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ActualGoat

We in the UK now use the traditionally US scale (the short system). So, for every English-speaking country, it is now Million, billion, trillion etc. But, Esperanto uses the old system, which goes Million, milliard, billion, billiard etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arthur0703
arthur0703
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I don't think it is an old system, it is quite live, because many contries use this system though. Including Russia and other countries.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergioOQ
SergioOQ
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales#Current_usage

I love that map. I didn't know there were other systems

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales#Using_neither

"Using neither". It's like, "we are not gonna play your game, westerners!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arthur0703
arthur0703
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Haha, those guys are cool :DD

Thanks a lot for sharing such interesting information!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ActualGoat

It's the old system for English speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arthur0703
arthur0703
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Ah, I see now!! Thank you for telling.

It is a very interesting thing actually.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
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Germans still use them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanTelloM
AlanTelloM
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In Latin America too. Millón, millardo (mil millones), billón...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunofrra
brunofrra
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Not in Brazil.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camcamcam753

They use Brazillion.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal
mihxal
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1.000.000.000

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davgwynne

I find the word billion very confusing. My native language is UK English but was born, and educated, well before the government started to use 10^9. Whenever billion is used I still, initially, think 10^12. People I know still use the English word "milliard" for 10^9, probably because they are just being awkward. However, it did mean that I could remember the Esperanto word for 10^9. Edit: I am pleased that Duo accepts milliard for 10^9 and billion for 10^12. I'll have to try using milliard next time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camcamcam753

That's because the USA like to think they invented English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davgwynne

To be fair, they have invented a fair bit of it. BIllion is one of those cases where they have changed the meaning of the word. UK English was probably changing faster than American English up until the second half of the last century.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pepbob
Pepbob
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"10, 10^2, 10^3, 10^6, 10^9" does not work, what a pity

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Margita_S
Margita_S
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that's a great idea!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevenvarner

Perhaps Esperanto should give up on the confusing large number controversy and use an adaption of SI prefixes for the words: megao, gigao, terao, petao, eksao, zetao, jotao. Gigavato = gigao da vatoj.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDeNice1
PaulDeNice1
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ten, one hundred, one thousand, one million, one billion, would be a more common way of saying the above numbers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siavel

I answered "Ten, one hundred, one thousand, one million, one billion." and it did not count it wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ben.ohannesian

I tried "Ten, hundred, thousand, million, milliard." and that also worked, and it gave me what you said, except with "a" instead of "one", as a suggested alternate answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LupoMikti
LupoMikti
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Quick question: how would you say "Tens, hundreds, thousands, ten thousands, hundred thousands, millions, billions, etc."? Specifically, I wish to know how to say the place values of digits in a number.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielqsc
danielqsc
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I think it's "dekoj, centoj, miloj, dek miloj, cent miloj, milionoj, miliardoj". In other words, I think you simply turn them into nouns by adding -o. "Hundreds of thousands" would be "centoj da miloj".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LupoMikti
LupoMikti
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Thanks! That makes a lot of sense actually.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielqsc
danielqsc
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Nedankinde :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Williams_Dakota

So what's a trillion? Quadrillion? Septillion? Sechstillion? Quintillion? Achtillion!?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tebis11
Tebis11
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What if milio is actually 1/1000000 and miliono is just 1/(1/1000000))=1000000? O_o

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Al_stelo

what is milliard? This is what duo gave me as a correction in English translation, the word "milliard"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielqsc
danielqsc
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Probably you know it by the name "billion".

The term milliard can also be used to refer to 1,000,000,000; whereas "milliard" is seldom used in English, variations on this name often appear in other languages. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1,000,000,000)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abdllhdygt
Abdllhdygt
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why not "10, 100, 1000, 1000000, 1000000000"

10 months ago