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  5. "Vil du hente en skje til meg…

"Vil du hente en skje til meg?"

Translation:Will you fetch a spoon for me?

August 27, 2015

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

So is 'Will you get me a spoon' a correct answer according to Duo? I had trouble like others since 'fetch' isn't in my vocabulary, unless I'm quoting Mean Girls, "Stop trying to make 'fetch' happen!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 489

Yes, "fetch/get/grab/retrieve/bring" are the accepted options currently.

And don't taunt me, I have the power to single-handedly make "fetch" happen as loanword. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deadsticklanding

What does this really mean? Is it a phrase when you want to go to eat outside with someone maybe. It does not make sense in literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sapiophia

It means 'will you get me a spoon?', like 'will you go pick up a spoon and give it to me?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deadsticklanding

That sounds right. But if you take other meaning of vil it sounds really weird. Do you want to fetch a spoon for me? Haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cursorcorner

"Could you fetch a spoon for me" is even more common in some places, but when taken literally is even stranger in a way. Both phrases have evolved as a means to imply that one doesn't mean to sound demanding or imposing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sapiophia

Haha yes, it might seem strange but many languages say 'do you want' instead of 'will you', including English, Slovenian, and others that I can't think of right now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaturdayplaceTom

Måske... Will you fetch a spion for me?

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