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https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Is the Irish course done?

I know they are getting a better speaker for the audio, but will that be it? I've heard people talk about features like immersion, word counter, audio lessons, and the like, and i know other courses don't have these features, but will they get them? I'm sure these things take time, but is there even a plan to implement these features into the Irish course, and other courses that don't have them? I can't see why there wouldn't be. It seems like the next logical step to enhance the course. I know it is possible, so why not do it?

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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Is the Irish course done?

Yes, in the sense that (the course itself) it's in Phase 3 (out of beta). See [here(https://incubator.duolingo.com/courses/ga/en/status).
The feature are like additional things around the course, not the course itself.

i know other courses don't have these features, but will they get them?

For all courses (so including Irish) the idea is to have one day all those features, but it takes time as you said. ;) And Duo staff has to prioritize what they do first and adding such features to existing courses may not be on top priority.

features like immersion

Duo stopped the development of Immersion. So courses that don't have it (or courses that don't exist for the moment) will not have it.
More details here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks. Why was immersion stopped? It sounds useful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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Did you read the quote of Duo staff in the link I gave just above?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Ah, I see it now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorHoughton
ConorHoughton
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There was some talk when the course first left beta of a tree 2.0, as happened with the French Tree for example; extra skill and extra lessons - I don't know if that's still happening; it would be cool to have more to do, though, personally, I haven't the need of it yet since I've never managed to get the whole of the current tree gold at once.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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There was some talk when the course first left beta of a tree 2.0

It'll happen one day, but when... not very likely to happen quickly.
See here for similar explanation about why.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorHoughton
ConorHoughton
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Thanks, that's interesting and, yes, the Esperanto course has a greater need of it, their tree is rather short whereas, as I said, although more is always better, the Irish Tree is already bigger than my ability to gild it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

One skill that I'd definitely like to see in any Tree 2.0 is one on recognizing masculine and feminine nouns. One on common idioms would be helpful too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

If they go with idioms, I hope they don't just translate English ones, but look up actual Irish idioms and such.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That would depend upon how well they’re translated from English — if they’re literal translations, then it wouldn’t be particularly valuable, but if they’re proper translations by meaning, then it could be useful.

The English-Irish Phrase Dictionary (1922) has some worthwhile examples (it’s organized by English headword), e.g. “on the other hand” has a translation of {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}aċt ar an dtaoḃ eile (“but on the other side”, acht being the pre-reform spelling of ach), and “too many irons in the fire” has a translation of {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}tá an iomad gnó idir láṁaiḃ aige (“he has too much business between hands”, lámhaibh being the old dative of lámha). The book’s preface states

In the present work copious examples, none of them original, but all drawn from the most approved writers of the living tongue, will show in actual use the Irish equivalent of the English words, and will thus inspire the student with confidence in forming his sentences on good models. […] Only the very best writers of modern Irish have been drawn on, such as {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}an t-Aṫair Peadar, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Pádraig Ó Laoġaire, Dr. Henebry, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Fearġus Finnḃéil, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Beirt Ḟear, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Seandún, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Tórna, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Méarṫóg Guill, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Conán Maol, {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Diarmuid Ó Laoġaire, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I had in mind idioms such as i ndeireadh na dála or dála an scéil, both of which I encountered recently, and which aren't straightforward translations of the same phrase in English. Or cluiche ceannais na hÉireann (though perhaps the Irish is more straightforward, and it's the béarla that has the idiomatic phrase!)

And I'd rather have idioms that are still in use today, than literary idioms from a 1922 collection that just aren't used any more.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Yes! That's a great idea. Do you know of a place elsewhere where such a thing is available?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No clue. There's a book (and memrise course) but it's more looking at Irish translations of English idioms.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

That's a shame.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's called seanfhocla chonnachta. Comes with a disk so you can search by topic or by area.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I can recommend a book for proverb type things. Well, if you want Connacht Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Yes, please. That'd be lovely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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recognizing masculine and feminine nouns

In some language you just can't since there aren't rule that works 100% of the tie (not even 80%), for example in French.
In languages having nouns with genders, learning (so by heart) the gender of the noun is 50% of learning the noun. If you learn the noun with learning it's gender it's almost has if you didn't learn the noun.

And Duolingo have you working on gender in all skills: each time you have a noun with an article (which is all the time in FR for example) and/or an adjective then you work on the gender.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

There are rules that help you to recognize whether a noun is masculine or feminine in Irish, but they aren't mentioned in the Tips and Notes for Irish - I only discovered them in the discussion threads, which the vast majority of DuoLingo users never use. In fact, the whole concept of masculine and feminine nouns is barely even mentioned in the Tips and Notes - there's just a reference to feminine nouns in the Lenition skill.

Given that this is a major difference for monoglot speakers of English, who won't be familiar wth the concept of masculine and feminine nouns, it should definitely be explained in greater detail.

3 years ago