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  5. "Jeg vil bli lærer."

"Jeg vil bli lærer."

Translation:I want to become a teacher.

August 28, 2015

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julius_Nebula

Why is 'en' not required here? (Jeg vil bli en laerer)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

While English asks for the indefinite article if one states one's profession, many other languages (e.g. Norwegian, French, German) don't ask for it and don't need it. It may even sound odd to use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rich.Smith

Is there any difference (or way to discern) between "vil" as "want to " and "vil" as "will"? I.e. Duo seems just as happy to let me translate this as "I want to become a teacher" or "I will become a teacher."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethChan1

I think, and could be wrong, but in this example most Norwegians would use "skal" as in "Jeg skal bli laerer." for "I will become a teacher." I am interested in the answer though because this comes up in other situations too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 486

Yes, there would be a strong preference for "skal" in that context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Van_Nocturne

In Katastrofe's song "Typisk Norsk" he uses "skal" to mean "cheers", as in when people are toasting. Can "skal" be used the same way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skynightstar

Do you mean "skål"? Skål = cheers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reyna289368

when do you use å with the infinitive form? i thought it would be when you use "to", but this says jeg vil bli laerer not jeg vil å bli laerer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skynightstar

Because 'vil' is a modal verb. When there's a modal auxiliary verb, for eksempel, saying 'jeg vil...' then you don't use 'å' with the infinitive, hence 'jeg vil bli lærer'. Other examples of modal verbs in Norwegian include 'må' and 'kan'. Without a modal auxiliary verb, though, you need to put 'å' before the infinitive, for eksempel: 'Jeg pleier å være hjemme' ('I tend to be at home'). I'm not a native, so I hope I explained this right, if a native could maybe confirm? Or correct :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victor_Str

Is teacher a job well requested in Norge? :0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

Do teacher and learner both mean "lærer"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 486

No, only "teacher" means "lærer".

"Learner" will be translated as "elev", "student", or restructured as "X som lærer X". So "Norwegian learners" could be restructed as "folk som lærer norsk" or "de som lærer norsk".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FilipFilip17

Shocking! “Bleiben” and “blijven“ means to stay in German and Dutch respectively. It’s interesting to see such a similar word have the opposite meaning in Norwegian (though I can see it doesn’t come from the same root).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 486

It can have that meaning in Norwegian as well, but usually in a physical context:

"Jeg vil bli (igjen) her."
"I [will/want to] stay here."

When you want to stay/remain something rather than somewhere, "forbli" is the better choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 486

Bare hyggelig!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STOPvaccines

But "we want to become teachers" is wrong? Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osarok

Because teachers would be lærere, and we would be vi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solvinter

Would "Jeg vil å bli lærer" be correct ?

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