"Haben Sie seine Telefonnummer?"

Translation:Do you have his phone number?

January 2, 2013

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/luizgsc

The system says "Have you got his phone number?" is wrong. Well, is it? Seems acceptable to me.

January 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/RobboK

It's great learning a foreign language - makes you remember reasons for learning/speaking the way you do in your native language. In British English, I was always told that "have you got" while valid, was poor English due to the redundancy of the word "got" - especially in written English. Having said that, you do hear it often enough.

May 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

Yep. A primary school teacher (in GB) insisted that you can always find a better verb than "got" and used to mark us down when using this verb. This worked well in a educational sense because when I'm trying to write something formal I naturally look for alternative. But to insist on the this in everyday English, as she did, is too extreme.

"Have you got..." should be accepted.

May 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/gtg388z

Why is "Do they have his telephone number?" wrong? Haben Sie can be used for [they have / you (formal) have] right? But I always manage to pick the translation that Duolingo doesn't like. Any help is appreciated.

January 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MoonDust

The S in "Sie" is capitalised, indicting it's the formal form of "you": Haben Sie = Do you have..., Haben sie = do they have...

January 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/rontardiff
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How would you distinguish this verbally?

January 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

You normally know from the context whether someone means "do you have his number" or "do they have his number", but it can sometimes be confusing. This is a problem with DL as you encounter esch sentence out of context.

January 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Axel584
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I don't understand why i can't translate by "do you have her phone number ?".

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

"Seine" means his. "do you have her phone number ?". would be "Haben Sie ihre Telefonnummer?"

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/adamitchell

No idea what's wrong with "have you his number".

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/IureaPaul
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well the correct translation in English is "do you have", instead of "have you", if you want so, you can say "have you got"

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/RobboK

Actually, both are correct. "Do you have" is the more common phrase, unless you're the Queen of England.

May 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/adamitchell

Indeed. My point is, economy of typing. And logic.

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MoonDust

But the point of duolingo is to be able to help translate stuff, as well as understand the language - to understand a language means to understand meaning and concepts behind what's presented to you. If you were to translate stuff by "economy of typing" it'll make for some pretty poor reading when translated into english.

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/adamitchell

I'm not so sure - duolingo actually tends to accept economy of typing when it's logically and grammatically correct. So I type "2nd", or "kids", or "man" instead of "husband"; whatever works the quickest. With the translations it's a different game. You want pointless drudgery? Fine! But given it's so easy to make all correct answers valid, and that it's automated, I don't see why one size need necessarily fit all. Moreover, my original answer, "have you his number?" is perfectly acceptable English. Just as acceptable, I'd say, as "we have five elephants"!

January 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/john.newbe
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Wow ! Have you got five elephants ? That's a lot of mucking out .

April 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/kirstinmjkeller

In American English, we just tend to not say "Have you his phone number?" It is like saying "Run you to the store?" I would consider it very formal and British American-like (no offense to any, just what I hear from my British friends) to say it like that. It isn't normal syntax for American English.

May 27, 2013
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