https://www.duolingo.com/jrg635

Official count of users who have completed a language tree?

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I recently finished the Spanish tree and it got me wondering how many users complete a tree. If love to know numbers and what percent of users that represents. Actually any statistics related to Duolingo would be interesting. I'm sure these numbers are kept by someone. Even a roug estimate would be nice.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/maddyis7

Seeing as how DL use metrics to measure and test all aspects of the program, they will have statistics bursting at the seams. BUT I doubt whether they would want to give out too much information, even if the figures showed that DL users were much better at advancing in their languages than users of 'rival' programs [ Not that any other programs come close to rivalling DL :) ]

Also I'm sure DL's overriding consideration would be 'would publishing these figures encourage or discourage other users' Who knows. It would need to be Beta tested! lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Code.Slinger
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I think that unfortunately, if they posted those numbers people would misinterpret the low number of people who complete the trees as being a problem with Duolingo rather than a problem with the majority of people lacking proper motivation.

In other words they'll think Duolingo isn't good at teaching foreign languages instead of the real reason, which is people can't follow through.

I've completed Spanish and Esperanto. I've started and stopped at least 5 others.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oskalingo
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The drop out rate for MOOCs is very high. Duolingo isn't a conventional MOOC but it shares the properties of being online learning with no enrolment fee.

Having said that, the enrolment rate for a lot of online courses is also often very high. So even if you have the vast majority drop out, that still means that you get a lot of people completing a course which they previously wouldn't (because of cost or access barriers).

Take for example, duolingo's English for Spanish speakers course, which has had 43.2 million signups. Let's then assume that only 1% of that number completed the course, which basically takes the learner to a high A2, low B1 level. That still means that 432,000 people have got significant benefit from the course (for free).

I wouldn't be surprised if retainment to tree completion is even lower than 1%. I know that duolingo has retainment as a very high priority and they are probably gradually increasing it. But even with very low retainment levels, with its high availability and accessibility through the mobile phone platform and its zero cost duolingo is making language learning available to literally tens of millions of people around the world. Even a small percentage of these people getting serious benefit from the courses they offer is still a huge achievement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristenDQ
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There's a "Golden Owl Hall of Fame" for people like me who have finished one or more trees. It hasn't been updated in over a month though....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarryBryce
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Even within people do become committed users of the site, there will still be a massive dropout rate. I've become an addict and will finish the French tree (and if they would add Estonian, Finnish or Lithuanian then I'd be all over them like a rash).

However along the way I've had a look at most of the other courses, and I actually thought I came here to do Spanish.

The ability to casually drop in and out of lots of stuff until you find what is you is of course what makes Duolingo wonderful :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrg635
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After vacationing in a Spanish speaking country, I decided that I actually wanted to learn Spanish (which I took in High School and some in college and never cared enough to try). I too got addicted, but I am still very bad with some of the past and future tenses). After I get a bit better handle on Spanish, I'd like to tackle German or French, maybe eventually both. But for now I am happy strengthening my EspaƱol. One day, I'll become a polyglot, though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronTupaz
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I curious as well. But I'm almost certain that you belong in the top 10% and should be proud for finishing a tree.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FresnoVegas
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There is actually a hall of fame where they list ppl who have done this, as well as the number of trees they have finished.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-..--..-.-.-.-

It's probably concealed to avoid discouraging people, but I'm pretty sure it's around 5%

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Antbutter
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I doubt they will ever release that kind of information. I imagine the number of people who finish a tree is extremely low, and if the number of people who actually finish gets released it will probably discourage new users.

3 years ago
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