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  5. "La prego di arrivare presto."

"La prego di arrivare presto."

Translation:Please arrive early.

January 2, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tango-alpha

So would the informal be "ti prego di arrivare presto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

. . . or rather Arriva presto per favore


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/konsuntier

What exactly does the "La" stand for here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diego_d

"La" stands for "you" as a direct object: I beg YOU. (formal, of course).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckyle8

So La is a direct object of Lei then? Would it continue to be capitalized in the body of the sentence, then, like Lei is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Jekyll

Yes. As far as I know, when you write formally, "La" and "Lei" should be capitalized even if they are in the body of the sentence. E.g "L'abito Le sta proprio bene."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckyle8

Ah, grazie Dottore!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

La = a Lei ~ to You sir/ma'am
prego = I beg/request/ask
di arrivare presto = to arrive early

~ I request that You arrive early.

~ Please come early (sir/ma'am) . . . perhaps with a slight bow.

If you are not close friends grown up middle class Italians are usually very polite and formal when talking to each other. You may say salve but never ciao to your teacher, your manager, customer, elderly etcetera.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsLagerkvist2

Why can't "presto" be "quickly" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

Because "presto" doesn't function as an adverb. "Quickly" would be "velocemente".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronzetheSling

Should 'I ask her to arrive promptly be accepted?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cinciarella

Grammatically, all conjugations of "pregare" are possible here..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoniNaber

Why do you use the "di"? wouldn't La prego arrivare presto work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MightyTharos

No. "Di arrivare" is a relative clause. It has the subject implied so it wants "di" + infinitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

Here is a helpful article verbs and the prepositions that follow them. Pregare is not one of the verbs that is followed by an infinitive. It is followed by di + infinitive

https://www.thoughtco.com/italian-verbs-and-prepositions-2011671


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John768017

Could you use preghiamo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

Yes,
Presente di Pregare to beg/request/ask
io . . . . . . . . prego
tu . . . . . . . . preghi
lui/lei/Lei . prega
noi . . . . . . . preghiamo
voi . . . . . . . pregate
loro/Loro . pregano


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat590727

Please come early should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

I've generally only seen "arrivare" mean "to come" in more metaphorical contexts. For example, a court case coming to trial would "arriva in tribunale." Or "la morte arriva per tutto." Since this sentence is referring to a more literal arrival, "arrive" is probably the best translation. If the Italian used "venire," then "come" would work in English.

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