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"Who is eating the fruit?"

Translation:Hvem spiser frukten?

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fantomius
Fantomius
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Could "Hvem spiser frukten?" also be translated as:

  • Who is the fruit eating?
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Technically, yes, but thankfully it's an unlikely scenario.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gashyyy

I thought it was "frukkten"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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No, there's only one 'k'.

The only times you'll find double consonants directly followed by a third consonant is in compound words, in verbs where the double consonant is needed to distinguish it from another verb ('viste' vs 'visste'), and before a genitive-s.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkFoxly

I am confused with "en" and "et" (I know about genders rule) but what about the subject, thing. Can't I saying "fruktet"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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No, a noun can't just change its gender :) 'frukt' is a strictly masculine noun, so the masculine form must always be used.

Feminine nouns are an exception, they can be inflected as either a masculine or a feminine noun, but you'll have to be consistent (you cannot change its gender in the middle of a text).

Then there are oddballs, nouns that can be all three genders, and some nouns that change meaning once you change its gender ('et plan' (a plane) vs 'en plan' (a plan)), so it's important to use genders correctly.

4 months ago