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  5. "Baineann sé a chóta de."

"Baineann a chóta de."

Translation:He takes his coat off.

September 2, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacey773203

I said "a chota di" and it accepted it but translated it as "his coat off" whereas it should mean "his coat off her"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fear754839

What's the difference between tógann sé and baineann sé?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

I'm not entirely sure, but I think "tóg" means "to take (something)," whereas "bain" means "to take off/to extract"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Shouldn't ot actually be "off him" (can't currently remember the irish for it) instead of just de?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I would agree, without the féin after it to make it clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Well, a good alternative could be "He takes his coat off himself." If you put "He takes his coat off him." I would picture a father taking a coat off of his son.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

That's what I was saying. Without the féin he could be taking the coat off someone else. It's ambiguous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

Is this a comment on the Irish? Because in English, you'd assume the phrase "take one's coat off" is reflexive unless given contextual information otherwise. And we don't have any context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNMmcg

Is it okay to think off "tóg" more as "take" and "bain" as "remove"? As in, this sentence could be interpreted as "He takes his coat off himself"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanGLEJohnENG

is bain+de needed to express "take off" or "remove"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

bain can be paired with a number of different prepositions - here's the FGB entry for bain de.

It's not the only way to say "remove", but it is the appropriate way when you are talking about removing clothing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobShee35

Does Irish have a reflexive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The Irish course has a whole skill devoted to Reflexive Pronouns

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Pronouns-reflexive/tips-and-notes

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