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"Each society has its laws."

Translation:Cada sociedad tiene sus leyes.

3
4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AshleyBlackwood

Why not "propias" leyes?

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

It doesn't say "its OWN laws" just "its laws", so sus covers it.

15
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michele.quinn.00

while true, as Casiquire says, that it doesn't say "its own", that's implied in the meaning. (unless its laws are someone else's and they've stolen them.) i find that Duolingo stresses learning somewhat specifically (and that's good for learning details), but when you are actually communicating with someone, your translations can be a little looser and still be plenty accurate enough for the communication. yours is a good question.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IforGot2
IforGot2
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Could reglas work instead of leyes?

11
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Nope. It didn't work for me. (Nor should it. Rules != laws). I didn't try it to see. I just got the two confused :)

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveSteml

I agree with IforGot2 that reglas should work. Laws are the rules of society. From the perspective of this native English speaker, the two are equivalent in this context.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bodwomon

From my understanding, reglas and leyes differ in the sense that leyes are written codes of conduct with legal consequences when broken, where as reglas are broader and suggests a rule of conduct/behavior.

Here's the link explaining the difference between reglas, leyes and normas: https://www.slideshare.net/Carlosdu/ley-regla-y-norma

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoonLorpai

Would "derechos" work instead of "leyes"?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/botsnlinux

My understanding is that "derecho" is a system of laws or rights, which is a little different than "ley".

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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Derecho is "right" as in a human right. "Ley" is "law". For example, you can say "I have a right to protest but in my country it is against the law"

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grrrr19
grrrr19
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So why is ha not accepted instead of tiene? What is the difference between the two words?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

Haber doesn't mean "to have" in the sense of possessing something, it's more like "there is". "I have gone to the store" is not the same have as "I have an apple" and Spanish makes that distinction. Hope this helps!

21
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Haber means "have" as the auxiliary for the perfect tense (always followed by a past participle). Eg., "I have eaten", "I had eaten", "I will have eaten"., etc

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eaarthman

For some reason I felt that this sentence was reflective (se tiene). Not sure why. Just posting this here in case anyone has thoughts on the matter.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowith
rowith
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earthman - Did you ever get an an answer to this question? I was wondering the same thing.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

Hi, I'm a native Spanish speaker and the reflexive "se" is not correct in this case.

2
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulioLuna10

Got it wrong twice 1st "cada sociedad tiene su leyes"
2nd "cada Sociedad tienes sus leyes" The 1st I believe was "su" was the correct answer and I just mistyped the 2nd. But if someone could explain the difference I'll appreciate it

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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1st: it is indeed sus. Those possessive adjectives agree with the noun that follows them, not with the person/people who possess the noun. So even though it's saying "its" which sounds singular, use the plural sus to agree with leyes.
2nd: 3rd person tiene instead of 2nd person tienes.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Reflexives pop up all the time in this tongue we are learning, sometimes illogically. So I think eaarthman is onto something...

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mishkek
Mishkek
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I wrote "Todos los sociedades tienen sus leyes." because I couldn't think of the word "cada" at the moment. While I understand it's not the same, can someone explain what's wrong with it in general?

0
Reply5 months ago