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"Mis padres fueron a dejar a mi tío al aeropuerto."

Translation:My parents went to leave my uncle at the airport.

0
5 years ago

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Allinuse
Allinuse
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my parents went to drop my uncle off at the airport - why is this not accepted? Only logical way to say it imo.

49
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian_Brewer

Correct, dejar means to drop in this context. It's one of the definitions of the word I come up with when I google it.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Oh, thank you! I've been scratching my head trying to understand what could "went to leave someone somewhere" mean!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperBachatero

"...went to leave..." does not sound right.

34
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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It is not correct english

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

It isn't, in American English anyway.

OTOH, I think this is consistent with UK English usage.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sue_Wright

Nope. You wouldn't say 'went to leave' in English English either.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoSolo

English english? As opposed to german english? ;)

-8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah.Kerr

You don't say...went to leave....in UK English either.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iphonedyou

Actually, you do.

If somebody calls at the house, and the son answers the door:

Caller - 'Are your parents in?'

Son - 'My parents went to leave my uncle at the airport'

Two issues here:

  • Firstly, you definitely can then say 'went to leave' - the parents LEFT, to LEAVE the uncle. Absolutely fine.
  • Use of 'at' the airport is inconsistent with UK English - we'd leave the uncle 'to' the airport, generally
-7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarsBard1
MarsBard1
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"I'm going to leave my uncle to the airport"? Really? No, I'll bring or take my uncle to the airport, and then I'll leave him at the airport.

4
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah.Kerr

We would say 'My parents took my uncle to the airport'. Not Spanglish!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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That sounds like leaving someone to (die, or some action word) or leaving someone to the mercy of airport security :p.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.Uijttewaal
M.Uijttewaal
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why not "to take my uncle to the airport"? it's the same thing, right?

17
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

In fact, this is the best translation, IMO.

Edit: There is another good translation I thought of, actually: "My parents went to drop my uncle off at the airport." The verb "drop off" is slightly colloquial (to me), but is widely used and clearer than "to leave" for this context.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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I agree that "drop off" is a more understandable translation. The "leave" in English is correct (as a transitive verb -- with "uncle" as the direct object in this case) but it is confusing in this context where an intransitive "leave" might also have been expected.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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The argument isn't so much that "leave" is incorrect, but really just very unnatural.

To me, it carries this tone of "good riddance, just get him out of the house!" Like you would go leave a caught mouse out in the woods.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

Yeah, I agree that those are the best translations. The only reason Duolingo has the weird phrasing is to practice the use of the infinitive 'leave'. It sounds terrible, but, whatever, if that is what makes Duolingo happy.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pilgrim2k
pilgrim2k
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I put take my uncle to the airport and it accepted it.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ohSuzeQ

yes

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

I can take someone to the airport without leaving them there.

llevar = to take

-1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Absolutely you can. And you can take your garbage cans out to the street for the garbage man, but not actually leave them there. And you can take dinner to your friends, but not actually give it to them. All these are possible, and are likewise quite atypical meanings. Typical is that the cans are left for the garbage man, the dinner is given to the friends, and the uncle is actually left at the airport. If it weren't the case, this additional information would typically be stated explicitly to clarify, since otherwise it would be an odd and unexpected meaning that was invoked. Hence I stand by my original statement that "to take my uncle to the airport" is the best translation of the Spanish, and I assert that Duolingo's is not.

11
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Well said, sir.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

I replied to M.Uijttewaal's question...

But depending on the context, they 'may' be able to get the same message across, however the definitions for each verb are different.

A lot of people use "to study" and "to learn" interchangeably but just because they're used as such doesn't mean that they aren't different verbs. All these verbs exist because they are different and not the same (what OP asked).

Likewise you can take someone to the airport if they forgot their wallet without leaving them there.

"My parents went to take my uncle to the airport because he forgot his wallet." is a different statement than "My parents went to leave my uncle at the airport because he forgot his wallet.".

All I am stating is that they are different, which is what OP asked.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PazKe
PazKePlus
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Awkward sentence

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaMargarita

I would say drop off here.

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DDaSilva

I agree. "to drop off" not "to leave"

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ezbar

"to leave" does not work in English, I agree

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leko12345

my parents went to drop my uncle off at the airport. not "drop-off my uncle", that sounds weird.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander.Braley

"drop off my uncle" just as normal sounding to me as "drop my uncle off"

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Certainly it's weird with the hyphen, normal without.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why is my translation "My parents were going to leave my uncle at the airport", wrong? Fueron a...were going to/is going to. What is wrong?

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hungover
hungover
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Went is preterite, were going to is imperfect.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Isn't it past tense continuous aspect?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/celesteparsons

in English it implies we are not going to pick him up

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camelor

Why is the first 'a' needed? 'dejar' means 'to leave' right? So couldn't you just say "Mis padres fueron dejar a mi tio al aeropuerto?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beryllium1
beryllium1
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Usually it seems like there's something that connects the conjugated verb with the infinitive, but most of the examples seem to have the connecting thing be 'que' (as in 'Tenemos que hablar'); is there a rule that would help determine that it's 'a' here?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

This might help for prepositions used with "ir"..

http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/ir_expressions.htm

And prepositions used with verbs in general...

http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep.html

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beryllium1
beryllium1
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Thank you so much! I'd since picked up on the 'ir a' constructions being most common (doing phrasal future tense clarified this for me, and it's good to see, looking back, that past tense constructions likewise usually use the 'a'!) but it's super helpful to have a broader reference for this.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klgdarwin11

Since mi tio is the direct object of dejar in this sentence why is lo not used... "Mis padres fueron lo dejar a mi tio al aeropuerto"?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgkoon
kgkoon
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You don't need a direct object pronoun when a pronoun is not being used as the direct object. You would only use "lo" if you intended to say "to leave/drop off him". The sentence uses mi tio, not "him".

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

The first "a" is needed to indicate motion and to connect it with the infinitive.

http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/a.htm

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgkoon
kgkoon
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Why is "en el aeropuerto" wrong? I've seen dejar used with "en" as in leaving something somewhere.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aga.stanko

Because "dejar en" is used in other context e.g. "déjelo en tu habitación" = "leave it in your room"....we can also use "dejar de" which means "to stop" e.g. "dejar de comer frutas"="stop eating fruits"...but in that particular context (I mean "mis padres fueron a dejar a mi tío al aeropuerto" ) "dejar" is used as "to abandon"/"to drop off" so in that case a preposition (with an article) is needed -either "al" (if the noun is masculine)or "a la" (if the noun is feminine)...I hope I made it clearer :)

0
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgkoon
kgkoon
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Thank you for your explanation!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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No estoy de acuerdo en que no se pueda usar, es más, se usa y es válida

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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Es totalmente correcto (español al aparato), así que puedes usarlo sin problema alguno, diga Duolingo lo que diga, en España se usa a diario... La frase "mis padres fueron a dejar a mi tío en el aeropuerto" es válida en español. Hay casos en los que puede que no se use, pero también ocurre con "al", por ejemplo: "el taxista me dejó en el aeropuerto", este es un caso en el que vale "en el" y no vale "al"

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Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amazed1499
amazed1499
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yeah, the english answer sounds odd here. I would have used "dropped off" as well

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidjohn999

"Went to leave" is wrong in British English too. We would say "took". ( to the airport)

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yiorghos42

My parents took or drop off my uncle to the airport seems better stanslation

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kholonie

Left and Went can mean the same thing

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cayandokun

I typed leave but only because I knew duo is a bit strange at times. "Drop my uncle" or "drop my uncle off at.." are the best translations IMO

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fpetraitis

'my parents went to the airport to leave my uncle' is also correct statement

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dvto2

The first part of the sentence could also be "My parents were leaving"?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whisted

Even I,being Dutch,feel there is something wrong in 'went to leave'. And I am glad not to be the only one to think so!

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfkeller

What's wrong with "My parents went out to leave..."

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AshleyBlackwood

I put 'took' thinking that it might have been some colloquial verb construction--it isn't. I agree with the 'take to drop off' given below--contains both the essence as well as the construct.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcVeig

Can this not mean 'to the airport' as well as 'at the airport'

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Reply3 years ago