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  5. "Leggono dei giornali."

"Leggono dei giornali."

Translation:They read some newspapers.

January 3, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JakeSpace

could someone patiently explain how to tell the difference between 'they read from the newspapers' [and] 'they read some newspapers'?

I cannot see how to distinguish the two functions of 'dei' here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

Leggono i giornali = They read the newspapers

Leggono dai (da+i) giornali = They read from the newspapers

Leggono dei (di+i) giornali = They read some newspapers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gwyllem

But the duolingo cheat sheet says "of, from" for dei.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radiator

This is confusing. This is the possesive section so all of these ones about "some" are really throwing me off.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notesurfer

It seems that Duolingo often throws in other words with the themed vocabulary in order to expand the number of sentences you can make. I find it to be quite helpful to learn the new vocabulary in this more contextual setting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssommer05

I agree especially since they both have the root of del


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Italian friends: could this also be translated "they're reading newspapers"? It seems that you have SOME article in Italian- it wouldn't sound right to say "leggono giornali", would it? But in English, "They're reading some newspapers" would not be used in most contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mercedes

"we read newspapers" I understand is correct according to explanation given on the combination with "di", that can express indefinite quantity


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hilaryllewellyn

Why not "some of the newspapers"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Holsen4

Is this necessary like the french "du"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nickruiz

What's wrong with "They read from the newspapers?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nickruiz

Never mind. That would be "Legono dai giornali."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuiZFernan667411

Sometimes pronunciation aren't quite clear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfmeulenbelt

Could it also mean "They read about the newspapers"? According to my dictionary, 'di' can also be used to refer to the subject of a discussion, though the examples it gives are all without an article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerreyP

The word 'about' does not have a direct translation. The nearest would be 'Leggono su giornali.' - They read up on newspapers - They studied about newspapers.

My comment above: 'Leggono dei alcuni giornali' should be 'They read some other newspapers.'

We see lots of people trying to make 'word for word' translations, and often it just doesn't work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mskycc3

Could it be 'They read of the newspapers.'?

(In English, this basically means 'They read about the newspapers.')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie14

Giornali sounds like donali, dei as de donali


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donnast

I'm so confused. There are so many meanings for the same thing. I thought dei meant "of the" in masculine singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VovodaVivi

duolingo translates giornali as daily newspaper. I had to put it to pass the lesson. Is that corret


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveMoss65

The correction I received is “They read some daily newspapers”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karin759762

Yes, as usual that's not how one says it in English. I read of/from the newspaper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoMor141307

I'm not an expert but I compiled the following to better understand and explain. In this sentence, dei (or de + i) is a partitive article or articolo partitivo in Italian. IT MEANS "SOME". Below is an explanation if you are interested.

Definite articles: il/i, la/le, lo & l'/gli as in Voglio i libri = I want the books (specific "the")

Indefinite articles: Un, Una, Un', Uno For example I want a book = Vogio un libri (any book); Un'arancia = an orange; Uno psicologo = a psychologist (z, ps, pn, x, y, gn or s + consonant)

There’s no plural, indefinite article in Italian so they use

a) adjectives like qualche, alcune/alcuni as in alcuni libri = some books

b) pronouns like alcune/alcuni, ne, certe/certi as in certi libri = certain books

c) adverb un po' as in Dai un po' di mele = Give some apples

AND FINALLY

partitive article or articolo partitivi which is, yes, di + article to denote "some" Del/dei as in Mangio del pane = I eat some bread or as in our case Leggono dei giornali = They read SOME newspapers

dell'& dello/degli as in Hai dello zucchero = Do you have some sugar

della, dell'/delle as in Ho visto delle ragazze = I saw some girls

The confusion comes from the preposition Di + article which (a) usually means "of" and the following:

(b) Originis as in "from": Io sono di Venezia or Di dove sei? = where are you from

(c) Topic as in "about": Molti italiani parlano di calcio = Many Italians talk about soccer.

(d) Comparison as in "than": I am bigger than her = Sono più grande di lei.

(e) Possessive as "'s": Caesar's crown = la corona di Cesare

(f) Materials as in made of: Wool sweater = Maglione di lana

(g) Time as "in" or "during": Working in the daytime = Lavorando di giorno.

(h) Movement as "by" or direction: Pass by here = Passa di qui; Go upstairs = Vai di sopra

(g) Some verbs are followed by "di" usually meaning "of", "by", "with", "about" as in Bisogno di = In need of; Innamorarsi di = to fall in love with; Non mi sono dimenticata di lei = I haven't forgotten about her


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlaCulve

God Lord, even the discussions are gibberish to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlaCulve

The hints say dei also means "of the", so why was I wrong when I wrote they read of the newspapers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

For 'uncountables', like salt or water, or whenever the amount is uncertain, we use 'some' or 'any' in English expressions as e.g. "Here, - have some water". It's called a partitive article and its Italian equivalent is formed using "di", of/from, and the definite article, il/i/la/le, - in this case "dei".

To instead say "of the" we would have to use da and the definite article instead, - dai giornali.

If you want to read up on this I think I can recommend using ThoughtCo

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