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  5. "Ni marŝas rapide hejmen."

"Ni marŝas rapide hejmen."

Translation:We are walking home fast.

September 5, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GottfriedK

What exactly does the accusative-n on "hejmen" mean? I have never seen it on an adverb before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It turns it into a direction: "towards home", rather than "in a home-y way".

Similarly with adverbs such as "supren" (upwards) or "dekstren" (to the right).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

Hm. In that case - I'll report my answer:

We quickly walk towards home.

as it was marked as being wrong.
/2016-Jan-14


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GottfriedK

Interesting. Thanks for the answer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vikungen

Or really anywhere:

Mi marŝas al la butiko = Mi marŝas butiken

It is a really neat function.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielqsc

But "Mi marŝas butiken" can also mean "Mi marŝas al butiko" (without the definite article), can't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottBoggs3

Jes, mi pensas ke. Se vi bezonas specifi, vi ne povas uzi ĉi tion.

Esperanto is great


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Is this -en ending allowed to be used with any place? Like could i say "Mi flugas Germanien de Usono"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaptianKaos8

Esperanto amuzas!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kostarewski

Like in finish. For example: me menemme kouluuN - We go to school :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raztastic

"We walk quickly homeward" estas akceptita traduko. Tio ĉi tre plaĉas al mi :>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomicxo

Thinking of «hejmen» as "homewards" is really helpful to me in understanding words with the directional -n. To the point where I mentally translate other such words as "place"-wards even when it doesn't make sense in English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

English translation says "fast" instead of "quickly." It is wrong. "Fast" is not an adverb. It is an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/domathnick

The New Oxford American Dictionary states that "fast" is both an adjective and an adverb.

Here is an example: I am driving too fast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"fast" is both an adjective and an adverb.

Run, run, as fast as you can! You can't catch me; I'm the Gingerbread Man!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

Your example is not a good one. Words are often used in different forms in poetry (license). It even happens in Esperanto.... Kaj unu por la eta knabo, Cxe la strata fin' ... My gripe is not with people using "fast" as an adverb, when it is really an adjective. I am grizzling because Duolingo marked my "quickly" as being wrong, which it most definitely is NOT!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I agree: We are walking home quickly should be accepted if it isn't already.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchlaueAffe

I am pleasantly surprised that "We are marching home quickly" is valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaeyongim

Can I say "Ni marsxas rapide hejme."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That sounds like "We are walking quickly at home" (with hejme "at home" = location) -- for "home" = destination of movement, I think you need hejmen here with accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patt3rns

"Ni marsxas rapide hejmen." How about "Ni marsxas rapide al hejme." Do they have exactly the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielqsc

I've never seen a preposition before an adverb. I think it has to be either "Ni marŝas rapide hejmen" or "Ni marŝas rapide al nia hejmo". Or maybe "Ni marŝas rapide en nian hejmon" and "Ni marŝas al en nia hejmo" are also acceptable. But the only one I've ever seen is the first one (hejmen).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

(en niaN hejmon -- the adjective has to agree with the noun in case)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielqsc

Oh, thanks! It's fixed now.

But are my example sentences right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I believe so, though en nian hejmon (and I think also al en nia hejmo) means "into our home" rather than just "home" (= to our home).

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