https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

An Interesting Thing is Happening to my Brain

I can`t explain it but recently I have noticed that sentences are coming together better. Conversations are starting to make sense. Hispanics are not talking quite as fast as they used to. It is an amazing transformation. I have been studying Spanish for two years and two months. I put in at least two hours a day but am more likely to put in 3 or 4 hours a day. Not sure what is happening but I like it. I have also developed an incredible appetite for burritos. xD

I had my doubts in the beginning but I am beginning to understand. For those of you who are already bilingual or more I`m sure you know what I am experiencing. For those of you who are still trying to learn that second language, stick with it. I am beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel. You will, too.

3 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/miacomet
miacomet
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This reminds me of today's Itchy Feet Comic

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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X-) Well, we do exactly the opposite X-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Other languages can seem at first like a blurry photo that come very slowly into focus, or a puzzle in which some of the pieces are missing. My two years of university French were complete and total immersion. No English at all. In one of my classes, my teacher often said something frequently, and I had no idea what it meant. Then suddenly, I realized what she was saying. It can be difficult at times, even now, because you appear to be standing still and you're not sure if all the hard work is paying off, and then one day you realize you've made a big leap forward.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

So true. I see it now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Yep, there is a light. I noticed it a couple of years ago when a waitress handed me a bi-lingual menu with the Spanish side up and I did not notice. Just about every day a young Mexican immigrant/child of immigrant, here in Minnesota, tells me (in very good English) that she/he must not be a very good Mexican ;) because my Spanish is better than hers/his.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mavricioh

That is always a sad thing, in my opinion. When people do not know their own language...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

It has been commonplace in US history. Folks here scream that immigrants should "Learn English (or American) or leave!" but it is the second and third generations of immigrants that learn English, and no longer use German, Welsh, Irish, Norwegian, Swedish, you name it. My great grandparents spoke only German, my grandparents spoke some German, and my parents spoke only English, which was "their own language."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mavricioh

Great point. I will use this when people mention America has an "official" language and it is English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

I`m looking forward to that day.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristenDQ
KristenDQ
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I noticed that too, at first when I started to learn American Sign Language (ASL). I thought signers before I started taking courses were signing really fast, but then when I started to learn and focus more on the gist of what they were signing rather than the actual signs, I picked it up a lot quicker. The same is finally starting to happen with Spanish. There are times when I'm in say, Wal Mart and someone will be speaking Spanish, and I can understand what they're saying (sort of). My mom (who started taking Spanish and hasn't finished it yet) still keeps saying "they speak so quickly" and I'm just like "umm...not really, I can tell you what they're saying if you want!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

It is a great feeling.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Bunny five! That's really great to read. Thanks for posting this. ^_^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buzzybeeforever

It's a great feeling! I've been learning French for six years and German for four years now and I was always really bad at listening but just recently I'm starting to be able to understand most of what I hear, although personally I think that listening to another language you're familiar with feels like trying to eavesdrop a conversation in your native language... you get the gist of what's being said but not little bits are missing... I can't wait till the day that I can understand all of what I hear!!

Good luck with your Spanish! <3

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zuquita

Wait, are you saying that they really aren't speaking more slowly? ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolunayo
tolunayo
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Congratulations. I believe in that transformation. Even in an adult brain, new pathways are developed to accommodate the new language. Keep it going, 3+ hours a day is a very large commitment. Bravo!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klemen702

Bassicly, you have spent so much talking spanish that you could consider yourself ''almost fluent'', like how you can instantly come up with a sentence in english, or can understand if someone says something really fast. Also the burrito appetite is completely normal, they are so good.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/volcidash
volcidash
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I know it all too well! I'm so happy for you! Keep on keepin' on :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Thank you, I will.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anebz
anebz
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Yes, that is a wonderful feeling :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lillyflowercat

Looking at stuff like this is always so inspiring....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/potatoking42
potatoking42
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That's interesting... Clearly you spent a lot of time on duolingo to be level 25, but what else did you use that helped you reach this point?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

Mostly translating English to Spanish and listening to the radio.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alterazu
alterazu
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I'm here for the burritos :P Also, yes, it's true, I experienced the same thing and it feels awesome!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/med-ben
med-ben
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Yeah i experienced that with French and English :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gyalchester
Gyalchester
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My family is very bilingual. I was born in Bolivia (hence my last name which is a city in Bolivia where my ancestors came from) and was raised in Iceland. Now I live in Ireland. Yes, it's a lot. I'm Bolivian/Croatian (My profile pic is a Croatian flag btw) / Irish/ Icelandic and a little bit Swedish. I'm learning only Swedish on here because I know have learned many other languages outside of Duolingo like from my family or in school. I know Spanish fluently, Croatian fluently, English fluently (my birth language) and a little bit of Icelandic, however, Icelandic is a complete waste. Less than 330,000 people speak it and only on an isolated volcanic island. Iceland as a country is amazing but the language is purposeless.

1 year ago
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