https://www.duolingo.com/voxlashon

Limón—lemon or lime?

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I have got used to Duolingo accepting English "lemon" for Spanish "limón", which made me think that Spanish is different to most other European languages where the cognate of "lemon" is used for English "lime".

However... I just noticed the sentence in food "El limón es verde." and my English translation "The lemon is green." was accepted.

Obviously, however, lemons are yellow and limes are green.

Is this a problem with the treatment of límon in the Spanish course, or is the meaning of Spanish "limón" a bit more complicated?

Edit

Thanks for all the replies. (I realised later that I'd got the accent in the wrong place, which I've corrected in the post.) If anyone is interested in this particular issue, here's a website: http://bebidas.about.com/od/Cocteleria_101/tp/La-Diferencia-Entre-Limon-Verde-Y-Limon-Amarillo.htm

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
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I was watching a cooking video not long ago on youtube and I think the lady was from Mexico. She made a drink with a lime and she called it a "limón". I think it varies by region. A lime maybe "lima" elsewhere. You can do a google image search for "limón" and see a mix of lemons and limes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
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are you sure it used "es" and not "está"? using estar and the color green, when talking about fruits and veggies, means that the food is not yet ripe. Even foods that -are- green when they ripen, would be called "green" if they are not ripe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Do Google image searches for 'lima' and 'limon' and you'll see what a complex matter it is. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
Mod
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It depends on the regionalism (as often ;))...

For example:

  • In Mexico (see here):
    • limón is the little green one
    • lima is the big yellow one
  • In Chile:
    • limón is the big yellow one
    • lima or limón de pica is the little green one
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

It's complicated because it's regional. In Mexico, limes are called límon. In Spain, límon is a yellow lemon, and lima is a yellow fruit smaller than a limon (according to my dictionary).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcragun

It is worth noting that what are called limes in the US can ripen to a yellow color, but are picked green because that flavor is preferred.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

There are also varieties of small citrus with colors that are not straight out of the "8 crayon" box. I've seen greenish yellow and yellowish green and Mr. Google shows us a picture of a sort of striped one with pink flesh like a grapefruit!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/voxlashon
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Thanks for all the replies!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gettajoy

I'm living in Chile and a lemon is called limon while a lime is called limon sutil.....at least in the grocery stores.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balaverde2

As someone told, it depends or the región. For instance, in Spain "limon" refers to a yelow lemon but "limón verde" refers to the same fruit but not matured enough . However, if you talk about "lima" you are talking about the small, green lime used in the key lime pie.

Hope it helps

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katissuper

I have the problem as well I'm used to referring to a lime (the little green one) as limón from time spent living in Ecuador, the yellow lemon didn't seem to be used all that often. It's sort of frustrating getting simple practice questions wrong for typing lime vs. lemon, when it's totally accurate in many parts of the Spanish speaking world.

2 years ago
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