https://www.duolingo.com/Eleganz

"Hast du ein Hähnchen?"

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January 3, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Eleganz
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The last word is incredibly unclear, and I don't remember learning it at this stage, coming back to these lessons a few months later.

January 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/adolfoabegg

Well, Hähnchensandwich (chicken sandwich) was mentioned in one of the previous lesssons...

January 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AmericanMaedchen

I also found this word a bit unclear. I had to repeat it a few times and refer to my notes to understand the context, but for the most part the audio is fairly easy to understand. And it helps that there is an option for slowing down the audio.

February 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/eleonoraonline

Is chicken both the animal and the meat? Or is "Hanchen" only chicken meat (you know, like cow > beef)

January 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Llynnya

You can use it for both, although I usually use 'Hähnchen' (or 'Hühnchen') for a (whole) chicken that is about to be eaten and 'Huhn' or 'Henne' when really talking about the animal. If you really want to say chicken meat you say 'Hühnerfleisch' (whereas 'Hühner' is the plural of 'Huhn')

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/eleonoraonline

Thanks, that's really useful! Does the "chen" ending mean anything specific / is it used in other words or is it random?

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Llynnya

-chen is normally used for the little or cute version of something. I think the correct word for that is 'Diminutive' (the rest is better explained on wikipedia ;) )

January 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/rodgersmc

English is a little special in this regard, which has to do with the aristocracy speaking French, while the workers in the field spoke English (anglo-saxon).

http://everything2.com/title/Anglo-Saxon+words+for+animals%252C+French+words+for+meat

January 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

Duolingo's usage in this one puzzles me. I grew up in the home of my German grandparents and they used "Hahn" for rooster and "Huhn" for hen. The diminuive (there are several in German) would denote either a baby chicken (peep) or a pet chicken. In fact I used to have a children's book in German which told the story of a visit to the farm in rhyme. The verse I remember went:

"Meine Huhner, seht mich ahn! Bin ich nicht ein feiner Hahn? Shoener Federn seht ihr nie." Ruft foll stolz der Kikerikee. Und die Huhner geben zu:
"Keiner ist so schoen wie du."

(My hens, look at me!. Am I not a fine rooster? You'll never see such fine feathers," proudly calls the Cockadoodledoo.. And the hens reply, "No one is as fine as thou." Forgive the mispellings; I can't add in the umlauts. But the way Duolingo uses Huhnchen leaves me with the queasy feeling that someone is eating either their cute little fluffy yellow peeps or their dearly loved pets, although, of course, during WWI my grandmother's family did eat their pets to survive.

January 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Llynnya

I looked this up now because all I knew was that we do use it for chicken we eat but I wasn't actually sure why we use the diminutive. So apperently 'Hähnchen' (like in 'Backhähnchen' = roast chicken) is always a chicken that is slaughtered before it can reproduce, meaning rather young (about 7 weeks old), that's why it's handled like a little version of a chicken, although it's of course not a hatchling anymore. (Note that 'Hähnchen' although it's the diminutive of 'Hahn' meaning rooster, is also used for female chicken)

January 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

Thank you Llynnya. My stomach feels much better, now.

January 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AmericanMaedchen

why, yes, i actually do have a chicken--four of them, three hens and a rooster (pets) :D

February 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Juanv
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Strange question to ask.

February 25, 2013
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