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  5. "Kokken har en gaffel og en s…

"Kokken har en gaffel og en skje."

Translation:The cook has a fork and a spoon.

September 6, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pfnuesel

How is he supposed to cook with that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanna_Solo

Is there a word for spork?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

judging by the websites of various suppliers in Norway on the web, the word in Norwegian is "spork"

https://www.oslosportslager.no/produkt/spork-orginal-7217.aspx http://www.army-star.eu/no/mil-tec-spork-khaki http://www.milrab.no/milrab-spork/cat-p/c/p10501110

And there was me hoping for "gaskje" or "skjaffel"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanna_Solo

Thanks! that's really saddening that it's just "spork" =[


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary_Kotka

'Spork' always makes me think of a really athletic swine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Panthera4

Great. Now how am I supposed to get that from my mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie942815

We used the word "kiwiskje"(kiwi spoon) because at school, whenever we were given kiwi fruits to eat, we would get small green plastic spoons/knives/forks that did not work well but it was a collectible


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alkimeer

'Skje' can also mean 'happen'. But when do you use this prefix?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Å skje" is a verb. Here's an example:

"Hva skjedde?"
"What happened?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arkhaeaeon

Skje (spoon, noun) is from Skeið, a wooden stick. It gave English the word 'ski', cognate to our own (obsolete) word 'shide'. Remember that next time you're eating a Skýr yoghurt with a spoon that you're eating it with a ski.

Skje (verb) seems to be unrelated as far as I can see. It was borrowed from Low German but means to spring up or jump (and therefore 'to happen' or 'to occur'). The common Germanic root 'skehaną' has some sister verbs which give English 'shake', 'shag', 'shock' and 'shog' which later became 'jog' for some weird reason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaiSoerensen

It sounds a little like the stem of the German word "geschehen" which means "happened". But maybe that's a bit too far fetched


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Geschehen actually does come from *skehaną. The ge- is a prefix to form past participles.
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/geschehen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alkimeer

Tusen takk, Linn! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Bare hyggelig!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alantrousers

I like the way she says "kokken"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sep780

Is cook just "kokk" then??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

yes..en kokk; kokken/kokker;kokkene


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Would you be able to say "ei kokk" to refer to a female chef?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

Questuon on pronunciation. "Og en" has a glottal stop b/w the two words (like in 'uh oh'), Is that standard? Or might it sound more like "o-w-en"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FatCatSpeaks

Does it really matter what order you say it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fintanfrex

The grammatical structure of a sentence changes with the order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaye263731

I answered "The cooks have a fork and a spoon." How come it's not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

Kokken=the cook; kokkene=the cooks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaiscool6

Ikke alle kokker har gafler og skjeer?

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