"Elsker du kona di?"

Translation:Do you love your wife?

September 7, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Heartywaffles

...Do I still love her? I-- I don't know. Oh God. I don't know.

September 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JHeaven

Let's save the discussion for questions & answers/advice about learning the language. ‘Jokey’ observations are best kept for personal social media; this common thread is more useful without such clutter. Thank you in advance.

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JiaJunKoh

Wow, sounds like a deep conversation coming on

January 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CogutCogutus

With all my heart!

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenDunscombe

This reads like a vague threat from a villain. "Do you love your wife, Mr. Anderson? Then keep out of things that don't concern you..."

September 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/besherat

Why is di instead of din?

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 162

Because "kona" is the feminine version of the noun.

Possible options:

kona di (f)
di kone (f)
konen din (m)
din kone (m)

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/besherat

Thank you for your effort, but I still don't get it. :(

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 162

The possessives need to agree with the grammatical gender of the noun they modify.

  • If the noun is feminine, you can use either "di" or "din" for singular "your".
  • If the noun is masculine, you use "din" for singular "your".
  • If the noun is neuter, you use "ditt" for singular "your".

For "my", the possessive forms are "min" (m/f), "mi" (f), and "mitt" (n), so it follows the same pattern.

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/besherat

Oh I see now. Thank you very much my dear.:)

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emily.m.harless

These possessives... I guess this is a way to build on "real life" conversation skills...

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/israa976005

How would you say, "does your wife love you?"? At first i thought this was the meaning of the sentence.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 162

"Elsker kona di* deg?"

The easiest way to figure out who the subject is here, is to look at the pronoun. "Du" is the subject version of the pronoun, while "deg" is the object version.

*You can replace "kona di" with any of the following: "konen din", "din kone", "di kone".

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/israa976005

Thank you very much!

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sweetelves

Would "Elsker du di kona?" Also be appropriate?

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
Mod
  • 209

When you put the possessive in front of the noun, you use the indefinite form of the noun. When you put the possessive after, you use the definite form. So either '[kona di/konen din]' or ['di/din] kone' are correct. Note that the possessive is usually placed after the noun (unless you want to emphasize the possessive), so 'kona di' would be the most common translation.

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/WivesBeforeLives

That is none of your freaking beezwax, DUOLINGO. GOSH.

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/freyjahellstrom

" Jo" in Lithuanian is like "yeah" and "da" in russian is "yes"

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting

This sounds either creepy or menacing (or both)

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/even207

Hey guys, its supposed to be "de", or it could also be "din". But "di" is very wrong and not a word

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/even207

I think the confusion lies in the pronounciation, and it is the way many children will write it, but in bokmål it's "de".

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/potatoeglot

Are you positive that the feminine possessive of you is de and not di? All of the results I get for searching online say that it's di, and the mods themselves say that it's di.

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 162

I'm sure he's positive, and also positively wrong.

March 3, 2018
Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.