https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

Ich bin verwirrt...

Was ist denn der Unterschied zwischen ein Becher und eine Tasse? Sind sie das gleiche, oder?

Danke im Voraus.

September 8, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa

It's not straightforward, because in German, we differentiate between Becher and Tasse in a different way to how you would differentiate between mug and cup in English.

A Tasse is generally made of earthenware or plastic and has a handle. So, a fine bone china cup you'd drink tea out of would be a Tasse, but so would the souvenir "I Love Paris" mug you bought for your auntie on your last trip to France.

A Becher usually lacks a handle, and tends to be made of paper, plastic or metal. So, those white plastic cups you'd get from a water dispenser, for example, are Becher, not Tassen.

Why don't you put "Tasse" and "Becher" into google image search to get a better idea.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

On the other hand, the difference between "Kaffeetasse" and "Kaffeebecher" is usually the size and, to a lesser extent, the shape (Tasse has a more tapering/rounded shape towards the bottom, Becher is more cylindrical) - but both have handles.

You'll find places that will sell you coffee either by the Tasse or by the Becher, in which case the latter is a larger amount of coffee since the container is bigger.

But the plastic/cardboard take-away coffee containers (without handles) are also "Becher"... it's complicated.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa

We don't really use the word "Kaffeebecher" in the south, instead we call those "Haferl", I think ;-) UNLESS they are made of paper, like those take-away ones you get at Starbucks, etc, those are still Becher.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/gamekeeper

You're right, in Bavaria they call a mug 'a Haferl' - although this is not a word used throughout Germany as Bavaria has its own dialect ;-)

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa

I always ask for Haferl. I can't be doing with piddly little Tässchen!

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/gamekeeper

Ich auch!

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna_Jansson

Is Papier-Tasse completely nuts to say for coffee in take-away cups? I have said that word on lots of occasions while in Germany.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa

It's not correct, but it would be understood. Clearly, as you got your coffee, didn't you? ;-)

Next time you get the chance, try Papierbecher, Becher zum Mitnehmen, or just Becher.

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru

I would say "Pappbecher", "Papier" would sound too flimsy.

September 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles

Unfortunately Google images isn't that helpful in this case. It's not particularly definitive.

Your explanation was much clearer.

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Siebenundzwanzig

That explains a lot, thanks!

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Berg123

No, one is a mug the other a cup

September 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sueefo

In a few German-language recipes I've seen that aren't written with metric measurements I've seen "Becher" used for "cup."

September 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Aileme

Those are very often recipes where you add a "Becher" of yogurt or (sour) cream or something similar and then use the empty "Becher" to measure the other ingredients. So it doesn't really refer to a cup, but to a plastic container for dairy products.
Here is a list of so called "Becherkuchen" using that idea: http://www.chefkoch.de/rs/s0/becherkuchen/Rezepte.html

September 9, 2015
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