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"Ich ging in der Menge verloren."

Translation:I got lost in the crowd.

October 31, 2013

29 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/check2012

What is this "ging + infinite" construction? I feel like I should be familiar with it, but I can't recall it from anywhere.

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

"Verloren" is not an infinitive. It's the past participle (German: Partizip II) of the infinitive "verlieren" (to lose). Cf. Ich habe das Buch verloren - I have lost the book.

The only difference between the German and the English constructions is that German uses "ging" and English uses "got". "Ging" or "ist gegangen" are sometimes used in the sense of "got" or "became", e.g. "Das Radio ging kaputt". The "lost - verloren" part is identical in English and in German..

Ich ging verloren (literally: I went lost, i.e. I got lost)

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/check2012

Thanks! Very nice explanation. So we can have "Ich habe verloren" or "Ich bin gekommen," depending on whether the verb involves movement or not. And now I see that "Ich ging" + a past participle is also possible. Are there other possibilities besides haben/sein/gehen? And would all past participles make sense with the "Ich ging" construction? Google Translate gives "Ich ging gekommen" as "I went down."

Thanks again for your help!

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allsey87

I'm thinking that "Ich ging" + a past participle isn't the pattern. I believe verloren in this sentence is functioning as an adjective/adverb...

November 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

Wow, this is an important lesson! I suspect many of us came to this without knowing this use of gehen or ging.

I guessed the sentence meant "I entered the amount lost." Way off! According to Google, that would be Ich habe den verlorenen Betrag eingegeben.

I would have translated "I got lost in the crowd" as Ich habe mich in der Menge verloren. I believe that's a correct translation of the English, but I really like Ich ging in der Menge verloren. This opens up a whole new set of things one can say in German. For example, Ich ging in der Eile verwirrt. (I got confused in the rush.), although that's not that different from Ich wurde in der Eile verwirrt.

June 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1089

You can't say "ich ging verwirrt". The construction does only work with "getting lost". "to get lost" is "verloren gehen" in German.

June 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

Donnerwetter! Was für ein Verlust. Ich wurde aufgeregt. (not ging aufgeregt)

Btw, according to Hammer's German Grammar and Usage verloren and gehen are always separate. I suppose that means that one would have to write Ich will in der Menge verloren gehen. (not verlorengehen)

June 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1089

you're right. Edited. Btw. you have a similar construction in English: "He went mad". Here the situation is the other way round. You can't use "gehen" in German, but have to stick to "werden".

June 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vy_Huong

DL didn't accept "I went lost in the crowd", I gotta change to "I got lost..."

November 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilya88

Yes, you can't say that in English.

March 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flex567

to me 'I went lost' and 'I got lost' doesn't mean the same

July 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

Indeed, as ilya88 said, "I went lost" doesn't make sense in English.

June 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nora.Ma

Thanks a lot

October 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riddleronthefoof

I had an English teacher who failed our papers if we ever used the words: Lot, Got, Get, or Thing. She argued there was always a more descriptive word available.I therefore always try to substitute 'got' with another word.

So that leads me to my general question: Could "Ich ging in der Menge verloren" translate as "I became lost in the crowd"?

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UBK10

Instead of being more descriptive it just makes it sound a bit strange.

August 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/umbongo

I have read in several places that VERLOREN means lost in the sense of losing something ("I lost my dog") and that to indicate being personally lost, one says ICH HABE MICH VERLAUFEN. Is this true? If so, why VERLOREN here?

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laruthell

Perhaps because its used with the word "ging"?

My guess is that "Ich habe mich in der Menge verlaufen." would mean that I went astray, or to the wrong place, and got lost that way, the crown just happening to be there to navigate through or mark location, and that "Ich ging in der Menge verloren" would mean that the crowd blocked out my sight until the people I was with wouldn't have been able to find me anymore or I them (like I was a dog they lost.) That's just a guess though. I am not a native speaker, by any means.

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/collectedsoul

Is 'Ich wurde/bekam in der MEnge verloren' okay?

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

Why is it 'der Menge?' Why is it dative? It at least seems like it's saying that I am going into the status of being lost, but that should make it accusative. If the sentence started out with 'Ich bin' or 'Ich war' that's when it would be dative. I would think so anyway.

November 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niceliz

"In" is a two-way preposition, which means that the noun after it will either be dative or accusative. It's based on motion, so if the sentence is about moving, it's accusative (think of "ins Kino gehen"), and if it's stationary, it's dative ("in der Schule sein"). This link explains it more if you're interested: http://goo.gl/tMTmuj

November 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

Thanks, but that was the source of my question. 'I got lost in the crowd' implies that I'm talking about the point when I was going into a state of being lost which would be accusative. For dative, it would have to be 'I was lost in the crowd.' Unless there is something unusual about the verb 'gehen.' Am I missing something?

November 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niceliz

Oh, sorry, I must have misread your original question! I see what you mean about it sounding like the sentence is about when you were getting lost, but I originally read the sentence "I got lost in the crowd" first as meaning that you were already in the crowd when you got lost. Like, the crowd is already surrounding you and you also got separated from someone or whatever while surrounded by the crowd. Maybe either is correct depending on what message you want to convey (I'm still learning too), but I think the accusative would make sense if the point of the sentence was that you were moving in relation to the crowd (maybe if it was clear that you weren't lost until you walked into the crowd and then you were lost). The way I think of it, the rule about motion and two-way prepositions applies when the motion is specifically about the preposition and whatever comes after it (like "ins Kino gehen" is all about you moving into the movie theater).

November 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

Actually, now that I look at it again, I think you're right and it is dative. Now it looks like it's saying that I was in the crowd when I got lost, so my relationship to the crowd hasn't changed since I was in it both before and after getting lost, and because of that the article for 'crowd' is what changed.

November 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

'I got in the crowd lost' ?

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1089

Nein, das wäre eine typisch deutsche Wortreihenfolge, die auf Englisch nicht funktioniert. Man sollte sich so schnell wie möglich davon lösen, zu versuchen, Wort für Wort zu übersetzen.
Die typisch deutsche "Satzklammer" ("verlorengehen" wird aufgespalten in "gehe ... ... ... verloren") gibt es im Englischen nicht. Hier muss das Prädikat zusammenbleiben.

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liayden

does that mean that "Ich ging in der Moment verloren."

translates as "I got lost in the moment" ? :-)

June 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1089

It would need to be "in dem Moment" (dative), and in English it were "at that moment".

June 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MillieWats3

So you could not say 'Ich war in der Menge verloren'?

October 12, 2019, 3:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1089

You can say that, but it's not a translation of the given sentence. This sentence here speaks about a dynamic action (getting lost). "Ich war in der enge verloren" describes a static situation ("I was lost in the crowd").

October 12, 2019, 7:14 PM
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