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"Tú hiciste las declaraciones."

Translation:You made the declarations.

4 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/basjevandenberg

Why is "You made declarations" not correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ridler28

I'm wondering this as well

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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That would be incorrect because of las, which here is a definite article and would indicate that a particular set of declarations were made. However, were this a negative then the article would not need to be part of the translation because English does not always require one to specify the negative where Spanish does.

Tú no hiciste las declaraciones. = "You made no declarations"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sgsinos

Then why do half of the answers allow for either? There are times when "the" is omitted form the correct English translation when the Spanish includes the "el/la" article.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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English can phrase to drop the article where Spanish does not, if that is what you mean.

So where I may ask "Did you make the declarations?"

You might reply with:

  • "I made no declarations" or
  • "I did not make the declarations"

It all depends upon the context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sgsinos

I understand the English and that's sort of my point. Without context, there is no way to know if it is necessary to use the article, but DL marked it wrong without the article, even after approving the answer on previous screens.

I have just conceded that DL is a computer program and most of my wrong answers are just problems or limitations in their code. Most of my problems with DL are with frustrating issues like these.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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No hiciste declaraciones" is a natural sentence. I don't know if the translation is the same. It'd mean that you didn't say anything (about something).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rollercoas7

It is "you made THE declorashons

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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You did the statements was not accepted. As a board member, I make, do, and issue statements. When returning to the US, I have to do a declaration of what I bought.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Every day I log onto duolingo and find someone defending the indefensible with some insane and tortured phrasing and justification, and this is today's winner!!!!!

This neologism - "You did the statements" - is a complete unicorn! Never has it been seen before in the history of teh internets!!!! Never will it pass again!!!! Rejoice y Felicidades a gernt para su contribución completamente original a la lengua inglesa!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hendy001

I think it's a matter of context. For example perhaps you work in an office and your boss asks you "Did you do the statements?" Where in this case "do" may mean "file" and then it would be perfectly acceptable to say "Yes, I did the statements". Using "make" implies creation of the statements, declarations etc, whereas "do" could have a completely different meaning in context. I am not sure if or how this applies in Spanish though with hacer, if anyone could clarify that would be great

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You have extended the meaning of declaración, which is limited to the action or effect of declaring. Because that overlaps with the English meaning of "making a statement", statement is one of the possible translations, and you have moved the meaning from there to the English meaning of a paper statement. That meaning does not exist in Spanish for declaración, for example a "bank statement" is un estado de cuenta. There are exceptions, one being complete noun phrases such as declaración de impuestos, which is a tax return. That entire phrase is needed, however, to make this a reasonable translation.

Here is why I wrote the above: I am entirely sympathetic to any reasonable interpretation that reflects actual usage and a context that makes sense of a statement that is otherwise opaque. I draw the line when the outraged comment stems from a translation that is both extremely unlikely and derived from an invented context when there is a more obvious usage without the invention. If you are good enough with Spanish to know that very specific usage just might exist out there somewhere, then you should be good enough to know how unlikely it is and to go with the more likely and common usage. It is particularly annoying when that outrage stems from someone's frustration that their extremely unlikely English translation of an unlikely Spanish usage isn't accepted. At some point it is not about learning Spanish and all about being right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hendy001

"you have moved the meaning from there to the English meaning of a paper statement" <- ah yes, I have. My apologies for that, also I hope my comment did not seem outraged! That was not my intention. In fact my reply was not supposed to be to your comment but to gernt's comment so apologies for the confusion. I was simply thinking about the use of hacer after this question and whether it applies in Spanish the same way we use "do" in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Sorry if I sounded annoyed, I truly am not. I was reacting more to being downvoted, again, for giving a mildly rude but appropriate response to a ridiculous comment.

About hacer...that is a difficult thing to state a hard and fast rule for because it is a remarkably flexible word just like "do" is in English, but for most uses I would say yes: where you would use "to do" or "to make" in English, you could use some version of hacer.

  • ¿Qué haces?- What are you doing?

  • No sé qué hacer- I don't know what to do

  • Hacer el amor- Making love

  • él protestó y yo hice lo mismo - He protested and so did I

  • Les hice venir- I made them come

  • te hace más delgado- It makes you look thinner

But like I said, hacer is much more than "do" and is used to describe unexpected things like the weather and thinking and to signal a period of time.

  • No hace mucho- Not long ago

Best

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gulmer
gulmer
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"did" was i put as well. i think it should be accepted, although "made" certainly sounds much better in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

Me too. But "did" it not was accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jniager3
Jniager3
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Could "hacer" also be conjugated to the imperfect if the context was different? As in:

"What did you do when you worked for the government?"

"I made the declarations. "

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Durante el primer año, hacías las declaraciones. Sounds good to me. But there's no context, so I would think hacías is fine here too unless the topic is the simple past.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelissaMil981126

You made the announcements - not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saxicola
saxicola
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I did that too, but I checked and that would be 'anuncio'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rollercoas7
7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vikola4
Vikola4
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Decide: statements or declarations !

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Can anyone explain in a clear, yet simple way, the difference (meanings) of subjunctive, versus indicative in this course? I would really appreciate it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Subjunctive is what's not happening or not happening yet. If you hate the verb forms, you have subjuctivitis just like everybody else. "Kiss me as if this night were the last time" = "Bésame como si fuera esta noche la última vez". This very much includes wishes as in "I wish (that) you were here". You can say "I wish you are here", but it sounds funny. Try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83lnl6hOmUw

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeBradle4

If I were a woman, (subjunctive) I would be moved emotionally by that song. Bocelli is so good!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerJames5
RogerJames5
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I still miss the lisp.. sigh..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamHud8

why is "You have made the declarations" wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Only because the editors are separating present perfect (have made/has hecho) and simple past (made/hiciste). Interestingly, in Portuguese for speakers of English, they don't, and it's more than just a style of teaching. Portuguese conjugation tables have different labels and no constructions like "has hecho". Silly me, I thought Portuguese would be very similar to Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nonie382966

Did anyone else have difficulty in understanding the pronunciation of "hiciste"? I did not hear the enunciation of the ending ..."te".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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That minimal or absent sound between words is normal to the point that we start writing it that way. "Want to" becomes "wanna" and "mi hijo" becomes "mijo". That's easy for one-year-olds and almost impossible for adults, dontcha think?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Nonie, No, the te is definitely there...I can hear it. Listen for 3 syllables before las..

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Shirlgirl007
Keep in mind that Nonie382966 might not have been listening to the same audio recording that you just listened to (ten months later than she did.)

And one more thing: Even though we can confirm that one of the audio files is working well at this time, we cannot guarantee that this same audio file will not become corrupted tomorrow! It could happen.

1 week ago