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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

Turkish family tree

There are many kinship terms in Turkish, many more compared to English, but still not as many as some Asian languages.

Anyway, I tried to create a tree to make it easier. I hope it is error-free :) Feel free to comment.

P.S.: A bonus skill covering some of those is coming soon!

click here if you cannot see the image http://postimg.org/image/da7j2ek6f/

September 10, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaeeSafaee

"Enişte" is one of my favorite words in Turkish! :D

Thanks, Selcen! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DetErMinNavn

Thanks Selcen! I found this quite helpful ;) Can't wait for the bonus skill.


[deactivated user]

    The Duo owl with the dress and fan is so cute! Might start the Turkish course soon. :)


    [deactivated user]

      When it comes to the spouses of your aunts and uncles, is yenge always the aunt that is married to your uncle, but is not your mom or dad's sibling? And the same with enişte for an uncle that your aunt is married to?

      But then isn't yenge also a more respectful term for a (middle-aged or older) lady that you are addressing? I noticed this summer that the children of my boyfriend's friends called me abla, and I asked someone about it and they said, "at least they don't call you yenge"... I took the way they said it to mean that yenge is for an older woman.

      Does enişte get used that way too, for men? As an honorary term for someone who isn't really your uncle? Incidentally, the kids called my boyfriend either abi or amca, not enişte. I'm just curious because I hadn't seen that term yet.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

      When it comes to the spouses of your aunts and uncles, is yenge always the aunt that is married to your uncle, but is not your mom or dad's sibling? And the same with enişte for an uncle that your aunt is married to? YES

      But then isn't yenge also a more respectful term for a (middle-aged or older) lady that you are addressing? NO. That's TEYZE for most people, although I know that in some regions people use hala

      I noticed this summer that the children of my boyfriend's friends called me abla, and I asked someone about it and they said, "at least they don't call you yenge"... I took the way they said it to mean that yenge is for an older woman. NO. That's only because they see your boyfriend as an uncle, so you could be a YENGE. But normally older women are TEYZE as I said above. People will call you abla if you ae older but not too old, like younger than their parents :)

      Does enişte get used that way too, for men? As an honorary term for someone who isn't really your uncle? Incidentally, the kids called my boyfriend either abi or amca, not enişte. NO, again as above, we call older men AMCA, and if they are just a bit older than us ABİ.


      [deactivated user]

        Thanks for taking time to explain. I may have mixed up teyze and yenge regarding when they said, "at least they didn't call you ___..."


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilknr1

        Although "teyze" is mostly preferred now , I remember, at the past, "yenge" was also used for older women. For example we were addressing to the woman who was our neighbour as Fayıka Yenge.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tugcetezcann

        a lady that you are adressing is called 'teyze'. they can call you yenge but it is informal


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
        • 2205

        I like that grandmother is anneanne and babaanne. Another language that does this is Danish: mormor and farmor (or was it morfar (-: ), mor being mother and far being father. The languages are quite different, otherwise.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miacomet

        Yeah, you got it right. Danish also separates "dede" into "farfar" and "morfar". I've even seen other compounds like "morbror" for your "dayı" and "farbror" for your "amca", but I don't think those are as common.

        I think the commonality is that both of those languages have agglutinative tendencies for word formation, although Turkish more so than Danish. They both like to stick smaller bits together to make compound words.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzlcdh

        Nice. Now I can see it thanks.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

        Thanks so much for this!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
        • 2205

        You used pink for girls and blue for boys. Is that a Turkish thing? We use those colours too in Belgium, don't know where the custom comes from.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

        That is done the world over. For some unbeknownst reason, people associate "pink" with femininity and "blue" with masculinity.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

        It wasn't like then in the past in some countries/cultures where it is now.
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink#The_19th_century


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
        • 2205

        I've actually thought it was a christian thing. (Ex. I only remember having seen statues and pictures of mother Mary wearing blue. The colours then switched after WWII due to the American influence in Europe.)

        Are these colours used in Turkish tradition? Or is there a similar tradition?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

        Blue and Pink are pretty much used universally, I believe. They are most certainly in use in Turkey.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Twoquiche

        Awesome, been struggling to keep these in my head, so this is a big help. Thank you!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gekkolies

        This site can't be reached


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elco299318

        Why is that skill not available anymore?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emredeniz07

        Çok güzel açıklanmış teşekkürler...


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzlcdh

        Çok faydalı olacak. Ama kafama karışıyorum. Bu ağaç nerede?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzlcdh

        I mean this sounds very useful but how can I see it please?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

        there is an image inserted in the post, can you not see it? you can also click here http://i.imgur.com/MWF66qf.png


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzlcdh

        I cannot see the image in the post and I cannot see your link because I am in Turkey and I just get "Ulaşmaya çalıştığınız internet sitesi İstanbul 1. Sulh Ceza Mahkemesi'nın 03.04.2015 tarihli 2015/1644 D. İş ve / sayılı kararı ile erişime engellenmiştir" I think due to imgur.com being blocked. I could use a proxy but I think I will wait until you add the bonus skill as the anticipation will increase the pleasure of it.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

        wow, typical Turkish ban. I will try to upload it elsewhere

        Learn Turkish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.