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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

Turkish family tree

There are many kinship terms in Turkish, many more compared to English, but still not as many as some Asian languages.

Anyway, I tried to create a tree to make it easier. I hope it is error-free :) Feel free to comment.

P.S.: A bonus skill covering some of those is coming soon!

click here if you cannot see the image http://postimg.org/image/da7j2ek6f/

September 10, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaeeSafaee

"Enişte" is one of my favorite words in Turkish! :D

Thanks, Selcen! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DetErMinNavn

Thanks Selcen! I found this quite helpful ;) Can't wait for the bonus skill.


[deactivated user]

    The Duo owl with the dress and fan is so cute! Might start the Turkish course soon. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clgibbons

    When it comes to the spouses of your aunts and uncles, is yenge always the aunt that is married to your uncle, but is not your mom or dad's sibling? And the same with enişte for an uncle that your aunt is married to?

    But then isn't yenge also a more respectful term for a (middle-aged or older) lady that you are addressing? I noticed this summer that the children of my boyfriend's friends called me abla, and I asked someone about it and they said, "at least they don't call you yenge"... I took the way they said it to mean that yenge is for an older woman.

    Does enişte get used that way too, for men? As an honorary term for someone who isn't really your uncle? Incidentally, the kids called my boyfriend either abi or amca, not enişte. I'm just curious because I hadn't seen that term yet.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

    When it comes to the spouses of your aunts and uncles, is yenge always the aunt that is married to your uncle, but is not your mom or dad's sibling? And the same with enişte for an uncle that your aunt is married to? YES

    But then isn't yenge also a more respectful term for a (middle-aged or older) lady that you are addressing? NO. That's TEYZE for most people, although I know that in some regions people use hala

    I noticed this summer that the children of my boyfriend's friends called me abla, and I asked someone about it and they said, "at least they don't call you yenge"... I took the way they said it to mean that yenge is for an older woman. NO. That's only because they see your boyfriend as an uncle, so you could be a YENGE. But normally older women are TEYZE as I said above. People will call you abla if you ae older but not too old, like younger than their parents :)

    Does enişte get used that way too, for men? As an honorary term for someone who isn't really your uncle? Incidentally, the kids called my boyfriend either abi or amca, not enişte. NO, again as above, we call older men AMCA, and if they are just a bit older than us ABİ.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tugcetezcann

    a lady that you are adressing is called 'teyze'. they can call you yenge but it is informal


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucBE
    • 1701

    I like that grandmother is anneanne and babaanne. Another language that does this is Danish: mormor and farmor (or was it morfar (-: ), mor being mother and far being father. The languages are quite different, otherwise.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miacomet

    Yeah, you got it right. Danish also separates "dede" into "farfar" and "morfar". I've even seen other compounds like "morbror" for your "dayı" and "farbror" for your "amca", but I don't think those are as common.

    I think the commonality is that both of those languages have agglutinative tendencies for word formation, although Turkish more so than Danish. They both like to stick smaller bits together to make compound words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzlcdh

    Nice. Now I can see it thanks.


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