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https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Verbal noun

When does the object of a verbal noun go into the genitive? I find the tips & notes section on this to be confusing. Also, how do you use being with the verbal noun. And finally, can the progressive form and the infinitive form of the verbal noun be used side by side?

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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  • See here for when it goes into the genitive.

  • I’m not sure what you’re asking regarding “being” — would you provide an example sentence in English?

  • The closest that they could get to being side-by-side might be in a sentence like “I’m trying to see” — Táim ag iarraidh a fheiceáil. (The preposition a, which is needed for the infinitive form, stops the two verbal nouns from being directly adjacent.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks. For the second point it is being bought . I don't know if that works in Irish to illustrate my point , but iv'e seen sentences where bheith isn't used, even though the english translation includes being. Please tell me if i'm being unclear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

See here

But for your example: Tá sé dhá cheannacht or Tá sí dhá ceannacht, dependin on what 'it' is.

Note: I didn't write in the Caighdeán

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks. Shouldn't it be tá sé á cheannach?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

In the standard, yes. What I wrote was Connacht Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

No, that would mean he is is buying it. This is confusing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

They're the same structure. It would be both.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Táthar á cheannach = It is being bought.

1 year ago