"He is posing for the photo."

Translation:Il pose pour la photo.

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

Would 《 Il se pose pour la photo. 》 also work? How would the reflexive change the connotations at play?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

That would mean "He places himself (somewhere) for the photo". You might say "Il se pose sur la statue pour la photo" or something similar, but not just "Il se pose" on its own.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aucunLien
aucunLien
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Actually, "se poser" on its own is a very common in spoken french. It's not quite slang, but is very informal. It means to take a break from an activity involving moving (a hike, running errands, etc.), or to settle down (in a new flat, etc.).

So XieC2's sentence could easily be heard, meaning that "he" is stopping whatever he was doing, staying at a particular spot and getting ready for a picture to be taken.

Out of this though, it wouldn't be a correct sentence, just as CoronelEsponja explained. The use of "poser" as "to pose" is non reflexive and intransitive, just like its english counterpart

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

Thank you CoronelEsponja and aucunLien for your explanations! Always happy to learn something new.

But, there is something I don't understand. aucunLien, you said that « se poser » meaning "to pose" (instead of to take a break or settle in) is incorrect, "just as CoronelEsponja explained". But I understand the Colonel's explanation to mean that it CAN be used reflexively to mean "to pose", but that when doing it requires a location!

So, is "se poser" meaning simply "to pose" completely wrong in any context, or does it simply require a location to be correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aucunLien
aucunLien
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I just mentioned this familiar use to contradict his statement that your sentence is incorrect as is. It can be correct, it just means something different - but you have understood that i believe. But then i meant to say that out of this meaning of "se poser", he's right.

In his explanation he stretches "se poser" as potentially meaning "to place oneself somewhere". While this logic is the basis for the informal use i mention myself, using it like he suggests is not something a native speaker would do - just like you wouldn't say "he places himself on top of the stairs for the picture" in english, although technically it's not incorrect.

Finally the straight answer: "se poser" won't mean "to pose" in any reasonable context. "poser" OTOH, in its intransitive use, means exactly "to pose". So that's what you should remember of all this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XieC2

Alright, I think I get it. I guess I am overly sloppy with my English since I have used "you place yourself", etc. in photography contexts... but then again maybe that a special case for a photographer, and not to be considered normal in everyday speech. Thanks!

3 years ago
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