1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Turkish
  4. >
  5. "Bunlar dün oldu."

"Bunlar dün oldu."

Translation:These happened yesterday.

September 14, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarynKJohn

Just an observation but it is quite rare to hear these happened yesterday. I woukd suggest "these things happened yesterday" or something along those lines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

That is already accepted :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraOz

Quite rare, No.

You will never hear these 3 words put together, ever.

I am shocked at DuoLingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

I agree that it sounds a bit strange. "Those happened yesterday" seems more natural, perhaps because "yesterday" implies some distance (in time) that would make "those" preferable to "these" in English (though of course the Turkish uses bunlar rather than şunlar or onlar ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Todd, please, take Duolingo sentences as they are. Here you can easily imagine a conversation between several persons about events...."yes, i know, these happened yesterday", but i could not go", something like that. Can you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

Hello, Mariane and Dorkykong. You see that my post was in response to DarynKJohn. I agree with him and you (Dorkykong) that the English sounds more natural if we include "things." It's also true that "these" and "those" can sometimes stand on their own as subjects. I'm happy enough with the English translation as given. If I were part of the conversation myself, I would probably include "things." It looks like the Turkish pronoun stands on its own a little better than the English ones, at least in this example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dorkykong

Nah that's not the issue. These and those are pronouns, and technically independent of time. The issue is that these and those can't always stand on their own. In the case of these/those happened, there needs to be a "things" or similar inbetween.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

How do we differentiate between haopened and died in Turkish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Shamshoom, "oldu"="happened", verb "olmak"="to bo happen, to be" and "öldü"="he died", verb "ölmek"="to die".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinimegami23

I assume that this would be a sentence that would follow some other sentence that would clue us in to what "these" things are that happened yesterday?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Yes, you're rigth!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraOz

This happened yesterday. Nothing else makes any sense. "These happened yesterday" is an appalling example to use in a language course.

Now we all have to get it wrong to get it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane584083

Sandra, DL sentence here makes sense with a little bit of imagination. Please, read Shinimegami's comment above. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drumwhacker

"These were yesterday"... is this a possible translation, maybe even the exact one? (Thx)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/havvayavuz

Why that not ?: those become yesteday


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

Why is that not "Those become yesterday"?

Bunlar dün oldu.

bunlar: these
onlar/şunlar: those
oldu: happened/was (or were)/became
(The -du is the past-tense marker.)

Learn Turkish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.