Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Él no ha comido hoy."

Translation:He has not eaten today.

0
5 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mashawantstoknow

Why is there no theory material at all?

36
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseATorres

First thought I had when starting this section as well.

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2ndpattern

Duolingo doesn't believe in theory, they only believe in us getting things wrong until we get them right.

2
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cindy854077

I was wondering why there was not a theory section and not really sure what I would be learning in this section. Good reference article regarding present perfect tense here http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/presperfect.htm

Was helpful to me!

34
Reply42 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PavelVlad23

Also this has some good explanations ! http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/35

10
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RomanticLyrics

Thank you!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaitlyn_Hollar12

I put didn't eat too

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicomiro
nicomiro
  • 15
  • 13
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

Is it not possible to write 'he didn't eat today' ? I'm not sure that the difference between 'he didn't eat today' and 'he has not eaten today' exists in spanish.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicomiro
nicomiro
  • 15
  • 13
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

ups sorry i was wrong. my bad

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Can you explain? I put the same thing.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicomiro
nicomiro
  • 15
  • 13
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

When you say 'ha comido', it's like when you say 'have eaten' in english. It's continuous past.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hokusai_1
Hokusai_1
  • 22
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 14
  • 12
  • 93

I thought this is called perfect present , is the continuous form not with the gerund ? "eating"

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EkulTheKing

The form is called perfect present, but its meaning is continuous past. Something that occurred in the past but has continual relevance up to the present.

3
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leighfy7
Leighfy7
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Would what CoppensWIM was asking about be "comiendo"

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Ok, thanks, I have to work more on my English conjugations.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yipivan
yipivan
  • 21
  • 19
  • 18
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4
  • 42

It is quite difficult to hear "Él no ha" at a normal speed.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Montserrat742280

You use the perfect present tense when the action is done and over with, but you have done it within the day you are still at, otherwise you would use preterite "yo comi" with an accent on the "i"

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charalambo847884

From whatever English I have learnt , I know that when one specifies the time of an occurrence one uses "past perfect" ie in this case "He did not eat today"would be in order. If the time is not specified then one says ""He has not eaten"

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 15
  • He has eaten - present perfect - the action is done but affects the present
  • He ate - simple past - the action was at some point in the past
  • He had eaten - past perfect - the action happened before some event in the past.
0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessicaArr985243

Are u all disappointed? I am...

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottishElephant

If it the subject is "it" then can you leave that out but if the subject is "he" or "she" then you have to leave it in for clarification?

0
Reply4 months ago