"Il marche."

Translation:He is walking.

6 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mnefariousl
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i thought "marche" means walk O_o

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/509am

Same here ... perhaps it has the same kind of meaning as "running" does in English? As in "My computer is running" ? Just a guess!

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Azendas

Indeed it means "walk", but you could as well use it to say "It is working", for example "Je viens de réparer l'ordinateur, il marche enfin.". You could say as well "Il fonctionne".

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diogo.Alvarez
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So I could not say "Je marche", right? I mean, it doesn't mean "to work" as in a job, correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melpopovich

Correct! If you wanted to talk about working a job, you could use the verb "traveller", as in, "Je travaille au supermarché" or "I work at the supermarket". Hope this helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galika3

It seems you know french pretty well. I have a question. Why do they expect us to know the meaning of the words since they dont have vocabulary? Am i missing something?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lepaslandas
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When should the pronoun "it" be translated into "ça" and when should it be translated into "il"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffTibb

I put He Works and it said it was wrong. Why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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Marcher is used to express that something "works", "functions", or "runs" in an abstract sense or in the sense of some equipment, motor, car, machine, etc. For people, "Il marche" = He walks. For things, "Ça marche" = It works!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/an1msaj
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I think "he works" would be "il travaille". "Il marche" is either "he walks" or "it works".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pasunparisien

I thought that the typical french expression for "It is working" was "Ça marche."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
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This gives the refrain of The Marseillaise a different meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/walkthruthefire

In french class I learned that 'promenade' means walk. What's the difference? (I have a feeling none of my French teachers knew what they were talking about. Half the stuff they taught me was wrong.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georgeoftruth
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"Promenade" is a noun, meaning "walk," as in, "You're taking a walk." or "I'm going for a walk." It's not a verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/walkthruthefire

Ah okay, I probably just remembered it wrong then. They did teach me a few things wrong, (like "Je suis chaud" instead of "J'ai chaud") but I don't think they would have made a mistake that big.

Merci. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rohiiiii
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‘il‘ is used as an impersonal pronoun here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iluaehrvf
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How do you know?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnatale
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Without the options, I couln't tell it wasn't "he walks"... as oppossed to a machine working...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camerabug

I wrote "He walks," and it was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hadia123red

Marche means walk

3 years ago
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