"Jeg orker ikke."

Translation:I do not have the energy.

September 19, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miniummanee

Wow, this word amazes me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NuriaHarket

What does "orker" mean? "to have or not have energy"? O.o Has it got other meaning? Is it used in other contexts? Takk!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

Sometimes 'Jeg orker ikke' means 'I don't have the energy.' It can mean a lot of things.

If you say: 'Jeg orker å løfte 50 kilo.' you mean to say that you can do it, you have the strength to do it. If you say: 'Jeg orker ikke å spise mer.' you mean to say that you cannot eat anymore. To have the energy to do something is 'å orke å gjøre noe'. Children say 'Jeg orker ikke' to everyhting they are asked to do.

Mother: 'Gjør lekser.' (Do your homework.) Child: 'Jeg orker ikke.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YohhhArtk

Orker means afford? One of the meaning i mean -Kjøper du det? +Jeg orker ikke Am i right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tdelpierre

I am assuming that it means "to have energy". Adding "ikke" at the end of the sentence is what adds the negation to the phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoffreyCa301149

From a linguistic evolution perspective, I believe ork translates to "work."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoaEinhyrningur

In Old Norse orka means energy if that helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chelsea162395

It seems like it goes beyond energy to unclude will and motivation. I think a colloquial equivalent would be, "I don't have it in me...." to do whatever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

I agree. For me the sentence 'jeg orker ikke' includes will and motivation. 'Jeg orker ikke' means all these things. For instance 'Jeg orker ikke å se den filmen en gang til.' (I can't stand to see that movie again.' This sentence is not about having the energy to do it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

How does "orke" compare to the verbs "greie" and "makte", as well as the phrase "være i stand til"? From what I can tell they're all vaguely similar but I can't find a precise difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

You can use 'å orke' instead of all these other verbs and phrases. I use orke, greie, more than the other two. My husbands asks me to help him carry something heavy, and I say: 'Jeg greier det ikke.' or 'Jeg orker det ikke.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaviva

I was also told it can have slight meaning to " I wouldn't be bothered..." :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

Yes, absolutely. 'Jeg orker ikke' is something you say when you don't want to do the things people ask you to do. Your homework , having sex, clean the kitchen floor, etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaPau

Orcs aren't pretty but they do have a lot of strength and energy. I guess I will remember this verb with this meme.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa954202

I've seen "manage" as a translation for "orker", as in "I can't manage."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Me too. That's why I am confused and am wondering why ''I am not managing'' is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

I am not managing would be more like '' Jeg klarer det ikke''.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ondtogviltonsket

Can orker be translated into feel up to or feel like ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

Orker might seem a bit stronger, but the 'result' is the same, you won't do what you are asked to do. Jeg har ikke lyst is another expression to say that you don't want to do something. You can say: jeg har ikke lyst - jeg vil ikke - jeg orker ikke .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinDracarys15

I put in "I have not the energy" and it worked lol I wasn't expecting that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AddisonianCorp

Such a short Norwegian sentence with a long English sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayBah

May anyone reveal the etymology of orke ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom77072

"I am not up to it"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom170268

I see it as similar to 'muster'? We do say 'muster the courage'.

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