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"Alle barna er snille."

Translation:All the children are kind.

2 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kerkid
Kerkid
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But german ones are kinder

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAmazingGoat

Baddum tss

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenisseMack9

Such lies

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidolson22
davidolson22
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Maybe in Norway but no where else it is true?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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alle barna ≠ alle barn

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyssKyllingen

Just to confirm: "Barn"= one child or many children "Barnet"=the child "Barna" or "barnene"=the children.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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'barn' is many children, 'et barn' is one child.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grydolva

That's correct. (Et barn, barnet, barn, barna/barnene)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roy563643
Roy563643
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So what is the difference between barna and barnene?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grydolva

None, they are interchangeable. Several nouns can choose between -ene and -a in plural decisive form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankDelga5
FrankDelga5
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Why not: "All children..."?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Because "barna" is the definite form, "the children".

"All children" = "alle barn"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhianna414022

I've was taught that sometimes a sentence with a word ending in 'r' followed by a word beginning with 's' often make a 'sh' sound (the example was 'vær så...'). Can it do that here too?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Yes, it could.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shuchun

...unntatt Erling, han er en fæling.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bricemuller
bricemuller
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Coughs loudly

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/09395639857

why not "snill"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grydolva

It's plural. The children. Snill is the singular masculine and feminine form, snilt for neuter (et barn, a child), and snille for plural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EarlDog

I would say 'kind' and 'sweet' are fairly synonymous in English, but it doesn't accept 'sweet' as a meaning for 'snille'. Is sweet not used that way in Norwegian?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simocone

"all the cildren are polite" should be accepted because kind and polite are sinonims

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grydolva

Snill != høflig. Kind and polite might be synonymous, but the Norwegian word snill does not translate into "polite" (høflig).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vilyon
vilyon
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And polite and kind technically have two seperate, but similar, meanings.

1 year ago