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https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

I just learned the genitive case

There's the nominative case and the genitive case so far. Are there any other cases, and, if so, what function do they serve? Also, are they covered in the Duolingo course, or are they just so specialized and complex and intricate that they're mostly glossed over?

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

There's also the dative, the accusative, and the vocative. The accusative is the same as the nominative, the vocative is easy to learn, and i'm not too sure about the dative. But you have already learned the two most important cases, in my opinion.

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm more info here on the cases.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

The dative depends on the dialect. In Munster, there is still some remnant of the dative for certain words. And it's also noted by the eclipse of words after the preposition and definite article in Munster and Connacht. It's noted by lenition in Ulster.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Yes, all I know is that after most prepositions followed by the definite article, you lenite or eclipse. Is that it? Should it even be called a case?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes, the lenition/eclipse is what marks the case. It used to change the form, too, but it still marks the case.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

Thanks for the link.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

The dative isn't too hard, but rare nowadays. There are a few words with very distinct dative forms like "bó" having "boin", but very few speakers use them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erchenswine
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I am not sure whether Irish has an accusative or nominative case, however I have heard that it has a vocative case. I believe vocative refers to a sentence like this:

"How are you, my king?" "Yes, sir."

Vocative case is used to refer to the person being addressed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

Yep, the vocative is used for sentences like 'A Cháit! I haven't seen you in ages...' Or 'A Thiarna!' for 'Oh Lord!', the verbal equivalent of facepalming.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erchenswine
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Thank you for confirming.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

It's odd but a lot of the learning materials I have come across either don't tell you that Irish has cases or don't go out of their way to tell you. Maybe the authors worry it will remind you of unhappy school days with German or Latin. I actually find it comforting to be able to think, 'Ah, this initial mutation perform the same function as such and such an ending in German etc. Ok, got it'.

2 years ago