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https://www.duolingo.com/gabela30

Agglutinative beauty and confusion

One of the beauties of Esperanto is that it's agglutinative: meaning that the language is made up of roots and affixes that can be brought together to form new words. This makes the language allegedly easy and intuitive for new learners, but I question that.

To answer my question. I'm going to list a few words that I have thought of in the past few days. I want to see if other speakers could see what meaning I intended for these words, or if they at first misinterpreted them.

-Ŝatulo -Aĝiĝi -Amamiko -Aĝotago -Gesinjoroj

-Friend -To age -Boyfriend -Birthday -"Ladies and Gentlemen"

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LunjoTO

Both aĝiĝi and gesinjoroj are esstablished words. If you created the other expressions on the fly, another Esperanto speaker would certainly be able to understand what concepts you are trying to convey (particularly within the context of a whole sentence), but then would probably helpfully supply other well-established ways to say these things: amindulo, koramiko, naskiĝtago.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabela30

Exactly what I was trying to find out. Thank you. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LunjoTO

Nedankinde! I'll make a bit of a change to my answer now, though. The established word for "friend" is "amiko". I did "amindulo" for "crush" (one worthy of love). You could probably throw an "et" in there somewhere to distinguish a crush from a love, but you could always modify it just by using more words. Ideas don't necessarily have to be distilled down to single words. And "ŝatindulo" would work just as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csi
csi
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Gesinjoroj is a legitimate word: https://en.glosbe.com/eo/en/Gesinjoroj

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabela30

That's good to know. But what I really wanted to know about was ambiguity. For example, "ŝatulo". I meant that word to mean "friend", but one could also take it to mean "crush".

I want to know if you made your own words, if people would actually understand you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
Mod
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Well, I've often heard ŝatanto used to mean a fan. Just to let you know aĝiĝi is also a completely ordinary construction.

You can make your own words and they'll be understood, even if they sounds a bit strange... it's just the nuance might be a bit off. Like if there's biblioteko (library) and librovendejo (book store) and you say librejo that would just be a place with books and could very well either be a library or book store.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabela30

Thank you for the information.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luko.
Luko.
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ŝatulo would probably be a person who likes, which doesn't make sense, ŝatemulo would be a person likely to like anything

3 years ago