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  5. "Mädchen, steigt ein!"

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tangershon

"Mädchen, steigt ein!"

January 4, 2013

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julika

@Christian has it all right!

And yes, the German language has several compound verbs and we are working on better dictionary hints for them. Until that's solved, you should only rarely see compound verbs in our sentences. However, you can always check if a preposition is following a conjugated verb and try it out as a prefix to that verb to identify possible compound verbs.

For example, "Sie steigt ein." where "ein" (in) is the preposition that is part of the compound verb "einsteigen" (to get in). Or for example "Er geht aus." where "aus" (out) is the preposition that is part of the compound verb "ausgehen" (go out). Or lastly, "Meine Eltern geben im Urlaub Geld aus." where aus" (out) is the preposition that is part of the compound verb/expression "Geld ausgeben" (to spend money) - and the prepositions comes all the way at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philster043

It's getting easier to recognize the compound verbs. Just have to keep an eye out for the prepositions at the end of the sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riqi_Tang

"get aboard" isn't the same as "get in"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davye

'To board' only really applies to boats, trains, planes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riqi_Tang

So what other context would you use the verb 'einsteigen'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

You can also use it with busses (Er steigt an den Bus ein).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riqi_Tang

Yeah but that's still boarding, I meant in a context where you aren't boarding some form of transportation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tangershon

Note: Mädchen means both girl and girls.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Not in this case, though. "steigt ein" is imperative plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martaccia

it would have been "steig ein", am i right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The singular, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

Would that be because it's 'ihr steigt'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jumpily

how did you learn all of these names like imperative and stuff?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillCWC

sigh I have no idea why "steigt ein" means get in. As I peeked the translation from the word "steigt", it means to increase. There must be a reason for this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

"einsteigen" is a separable verb. Duolingo's dictionary doesn't recognise these verbs as one unit. You'll need to use a proper dictionary. I recommend http://www.pons.eu/

Some resources on separable verbs:

http://german.about.com/library/anfang/blanfang19.htm

http://german.about.com/library/verbs/blverb_pre01.htm

http://www.nthuleen.com/teach/grammar/sepinsepprefixexpl.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separable_verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mstoyn

I guess they updated it. Now it recognizes "separable verbs" (is that the term really).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

I learned it as "separable prefix verbs," although it's possible that "separable verbs" may be acceptable as well.

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