" bhfuil do chuid airgid?"

Translation:Where is your money?

September 24, 2015

9 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elifoxfly

Obviously a necessary sentence for anyone aiming to become a robber in Ireland. :P

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrehonEire

Or a politician :o

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

Best reply ever! XD

December 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyORB

Totally :D

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kalashnikitty

Duo the Dreadful, terror of the Old Duolingo West . . . many harmless travelers were robbed by this merciless grammar teacher on the road to Fluency . . .

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clutchgrant

Why is this not "Where is your share of THE money"?

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Because the partitive dative would be needed for that meaning — do chuid den airgead.

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Loutre

Would the answer "Where is your silver?" theoretically be correct? Even if I get that this sentence would not make much sense in English. Moreover, could someone please confirm or rule out the fact that “airgead” seems to have the same double understanding (“silver” and “money”) as the French “argent”?

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kalashnikitty

Yes, it's the same idea as argent in French. It makes sense, since silver used to be a main currency, so money was often silver.

so, technically, "where is your silver" would be correct, but unless you're specifically discussing metals or jewelry, "money" would be a good default translation.

March 12, 2018
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