https://www.duolingo.com/Dan.Cline

The Future of Language

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This article delves into which languages will be dominant in business, travel, and literature: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/09/24/the-future-of-language/

September 24, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline

I always find it funny when these articles mention L1 speaker volumes and advocate learning a second language to communicate with folks from other countries (for business and other reasons) but conveniently skip to mention the already existing L2+L3 speakers base for English which is probably just as large as the native base.

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LeVieuxSieur

in fact, there are at least two (and maybe even three) non-native English speakers for every native one out there in the world, so there you go (source: various talks by David Crystal)

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
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Why was this down-voted? I read the article, and it was perhaps not very original, but still very interesting.

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/qwertylaal

Well it did say that French will be the language of the future... And Hindi and Urdu as one language...

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
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When one talks about learning a language, especially Hindi and Urdu, it's mainly the colloquial version. Colloquial hindi and urdu are not different. Just... 1-5% of differences maybe, otherwise, the grammar etc is the same. Also, the differences in grammar are known to each other, so even though one can guess the language being spoken by a person, he/she can perfectly know about the person is saying. I don't belong to the group which says that the languages are the same except the script, neither do I belong to the group which strictly opposes the similarity of the languages. I stay neutral, it depends actually. The literature of the languages are totally different. Somewhere or the other, hindi speakers will understand more urdu and compared to the opposite situation. The scripts are obviously different and when you go to the literature and pure forms of the languages, they differ so much that one can't even imagine. ;)

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Pratyush.
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When I looked those trailers ans some scenes of Urdu movies from Pakistan, Those were exactly like Hindi, I mean all of the words were the one I knew already. But if we go to literature. Then, Pure Hindi feels a way awkward. Which is different from colloquial version.

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
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I have seen the trailer of "Waar". It's just like Hindi movies. But I wouldn't agree on one thing. Pure Hindi is not "awkward". It's more scientific. People feel that the words look more weird because they sound funny. But nah. I don't feel so. They're look as beautiful as pure Urdu Persian words.

September 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Pratyush.
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That's what I wanted to say....sounds 'funny' but people never tend to say or hear in Pure Hindi. Sometimes I feel like I am getting a bit strange look when I speak Hindi. People say what I am saying when I say 'Varsha ho rahi hai", "Hashi ruk nahi rahi hai" and then once whole class erupted with laughter when I asked teacher that "What is significance of calculating radius of Gyration?" "Radius of Gyration ko calculate karne ka auchitya kya hai?" Once upon a time a cook was telling me that I am very less speaking, silent type person? I said, ' haan, mai antermukhi swabhaav ka hun." He said that, "aisa word use kar rahe ho jise sunkar hansi aata hai. (Your word sounds very funny)". I then just want to disappear.

September 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

"In other words: There is no one single language of the future. Instead, language learners will increasingly have to ask themselves about their goals and own motivations before making a decision."

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/KristenDQ
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I find it interesting that Chinese and Hindi are at the top of that list. I thought for sure Spanish would be at the top, with it being so widely used.

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Delta1212
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The populations of China and India put together represent well over a third of the entire global population.

I could quibble a bit about dialects, but still, that's a lot of people.

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

Do you have a Chinese keyboard or printer? Or any of the twenty nine Indian languages?

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Skippero
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That article tries to make us believe that it's a numbers game. A bit like that old saying "Eat rotten food, a million flies can't be wrong" (I know, I know : The original saying is a bit more explicit ;).

Number of people does not equal market opportunity. Nor greatness of architecture. Nor beauty of poetry. Nor culture. Nor whatever.

Instead of welcoming the wealth of differences, the article threats us into a couple of must-know-or-else languages. Sad.

Still: An interesting view on the richness of things. Thanks for sharing!

September 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjodni
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So cool! ( I always wanted to learn Indonesian/Malaysian....now I have an excuse!)

September 24, 2015
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