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https://www.duolingo.com/Remy

The origins of common words on fascinating maps

Remy
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This article is a very interesting read to know more about the origins of common words in many languages:

http://www.businessinsider.com/european-maps-showing-origins-of-common-words-2013-11

Have fun reading!

4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/oskalingo
oskalingo
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Going to the source, these maps appear to have been created by reddit user Bezbojnicul.

The (revised) maps can be found in this imgur gallery:
http://imgur.com/a/zrznb

Bezbojnicul posted the gallery of maps to subreddits Europe and linguistics. The discussion threads are here:
http://www.reddit.com/r/europe/comments/1pqu05/europe_etymology_maps_some_new_some_old/
http://www.reddit.com/r/linguistics/comments/1pqtzn/europe_etymology_maps_some_new_some_old/

Redditor sp07 reposted the gallery to the etymology subreddit. The discussion thread is here:
http://www.reddit.com/r/etymology/comments/1pxjuh/interesting_european_etymology_maps/

And that last discussion thread is the one from which businessinsider.com appear to have derived their article.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dofn2

This is extremely poor journalism in my view. Nowhere does he explicitly reference the fact he did not create those maps or link to the creator's reddit user page - (the only linking to reddit he does is to some commentary from another user).

There are tiny reference links on the images, but all these do is take you to imgur and doesn't credit the content by the creator's name, which is completely unacceptable to me.

It is clearly evident from the comments on the article that many of the users believe BI created the content.

I wouldn't say it is plagiarism, but it is pretty shoddy and doesn't give the original author anywhere near enough prominence or credit IMO. They've derived a lot of traffic and advertising revenue from someone else's graft.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adesva
adesva
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Don't know if this is a new addition, but the second paragraph goes, "that quote comes to mind looking at these fascinating European etymology maps of various commons words posted by reddit user sp07, which provide a kind of cultural commentary on Europe."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dofn2

As demonstrated by your experience, the article is rather misleading; the author of the maps is actually http://reddit.com/u/Bezbojnicul

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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Interesting that almost all of the countries call a pineapple some variant of "ananas" from the language spoken by the native Tupi people of Brazil, and yet the Brazilians call a pineapple "um abacaxi", another Tupi word. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/abacaxi

Edit: I found out why. http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anan%C3%A1s

O termo abacaxi (em português) é, com forte probabilidade, oriundo do tupi ibacati, ‘bodum ou fedor de fruto’, ‘fruto fedorento’ (ibá, ‘fruto’, cati, ‘recender ou cheirar fortemente’), documentado já no início do séc. XIX.

O termo ananás (em português e espanhol) é do guarani naná, e documentado em português na primeira metade do séc. XVI e em espanhol na segunda (1578), em que é empréstimo do português do Brasil ou da sua língua geral. O termo abacaxi também é um termo ameríndio.1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guarani_language

Guaraní (/ˈɡwɑrəniː/ or /ɡwærəˈniː/),[3] specifically the primary variety known as Paraguayan Guaraní (endonym avañe'ẽ [aʋãɲẽˈʔẽ] 'Ava language'), is an indigenous language of South America that belongs to the Tupí–Guaraní subfamily of the Tupian languages. It is one of the official languages of Paraguay (along with Spanish),

And then from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineapple#History

The plant is indigenous to South America and is said to originate from the area between Southern Brazil and Paraguay; however, it is important to note that little is known about the origin of the domesticated pineapple

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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Since we're talking about pineapples, I'm not convinced about the origin of the english word. It seems to me like 'pineapple' would have come about as slang for an 'apple' that looks like a pine cone... which are something of a fixture at this latitude. It seems much more likely than some illogical corruption of a latin word, which are usually reserved for more scientific things in english anyway.

My gut tells me so, and wikipedia seems to agree :o)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InodiLinden
InodiLinden
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I liked the etymology of the word "rose", who would have thought "troyanda" means "thirty petals" in Greek. Now I wonder how it sounds in Moldavian.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goran12
Goran12
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For the first word, "church": in Czech "kostel" (from latin "castellum") means the building and "církev" (from Greek "kyriakon") means the people. In Slovak, variant of the latter can mean a building too, but only one belonging to Orthodox church.

The reason is clear: (most) churches and (some) fortifications were the only stone buildings in the early middle ages, so naming temples of this newly coming religion after the latin word for fortification was quite natural. Mission of saint Cyril and Methodius imprinted the Old Church Slavic word for church into the Slavic dialect that evolved to modern Czech and Slovak (meaning both people and wooden building, but not its impressive stone variant), but not to the dialect of the ancestors of the Polish, where the word for the stone building got the same meaning as "church" has in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DamedesLangues
DamedesLangues
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C'est très intéressant, merci, Remy !

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lolaphilologist
lolaphilologist
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great read, thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quest42good
quest42good
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This is extremely interesting! Could never imagine that Armenian "ekegheci" has the same roots as the French "eglise" and Spanish "iglesia". As to "ananas" (pineapple), we rather call it "arkayakhndzor" in Armenian, which literally means "king's apple" or "royal apple".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mare_sargasso
mare_sargasso
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Great work! Salatalık, which means cucumber in Turkish, was written with a typo, and the substitute word hıyar, which is considered rude and can be used pejoratively, might be ignored though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGandalf
TheGandalf
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Affascinante!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/epac-mcl
epac-mcl
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This is very interesting. This is how I started to learn Danish, by being aware of the common Words. i.e. Skal vi gaa = shall we go.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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These maps are cool because they sort of confirm something that I have always felt about European languages - that although there are politically 50 different languages in Europe (less or more, I don't know), there are usually only a few basic ways to call something. It also conveniently coalesces with another fact, that since English has had so much outside influence over the years, we usually have at least two or three of them in our own language if you dig deep enough.

For the sake of an example, its easy to remember two other words for 'bear' because the germanic ones are near identical, and the romance ones are all based on the constellation 'Ursa minor', or the 'little bear' which as we all know is the location where the Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy is published by Megadodo Publications.

Which is obviously not true, but Douglas Adams managed to sneak that word into my brain quite memorably, and it seems to have done just as well to cement it in my head as having read "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" in latin would have, in fact probably better because I don't know the first thing about latin, and I can't see the slightest use in studying a language that nobody talks anymore.

Anyway, to try and stop waffling, wouldn't it be interesting if there was an organised, intentional effort to smuggle 1 or 2 new words for everything into our languages, so that even people who are not studying languages would be subconsciously absorbing a little bit?

Eg A children's book about a bear named "Ursa" would be one way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michael.ka

Very, very interesting

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javiersfz

Supernice!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bahiababe

Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulscon

This is awesome dude

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matson
matson
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thanks, that was interesting

4 years ago