"Le lion mange jusqu'à la nuit."

Translation:The lion eats until nightfall.

January 4, 2013

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad

in the fast version, 'lion' sound like 'loup'

July 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/EthanTown

They must've fixed it, because as of 18 Jan 2015, 'lion' in the fast version sounds like LOHN, as opposed to 'loup' which would sound like LOO

January 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/amtwt01

It sounds like "lon" to me too.

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pattymac60

Can anyone explain the difference between "jusque" and "jusqu'a

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

I copied this from one of the site wizards, probably Sitesurf ...

difference between jusque and jusqu'à.

Jusque is generally constructed with preposition "à" and means up to or until, ie both temporal and spatial notions:

<pre>J'attendrai jusqu'à son retour. La réunion a duré jusqu'à huit heures. Il le conduit jusqu'à la frontière. Elle l'a raccompagné jusqu'à sa maison. </pre>

Note: if another preposition is used, "à" disappears: "jusque chez lui"

When "jusque" is followed by other adverbs: "alors, ici, où", it is elided:

<pre>Jusqu'alors, il était calme La forêt s'étend jusqu'ici Jusqu'où êtes-vous prêt à investir ? Ma pelouse est tondue jusque-là (note the hyphen, like other words constructed with -là: </pre>

celui-là, ce jour-là...)

December 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems

Jusqu'à = jusque + à. You can't have 2 vowels together so the e is removed and replaced with the apostrophe. Here are some examples of the use of the word "jusque" that may help you understand when/where/how it is used. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/jusque

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy

The link provided does not provide any help at all in answering the question posed, which is, what is the difference in meaning between jusque and jusqu'à.

Elision refers to spelling. The question posted here relates to meaning.

More to the point, what is Duo's use of two terms? I looked at a dozen different definitions of the two terms. One concise explanation of the difference was that jusque/until related to time (until later) and jusqu'à/until related to space (until the first right turn).

However that is not how Duo is using it here. Not to say Duo is wrong because every definition I came across varied considerably. The one thing that did strike me is that jusqu'à is much more prevalent.

Duo will mark uses of jusque that it doesn't like as incorrect. That being the case Duo might consider using the two terms in phrases that make it clear what the difference is. When they mark them wrong they do not give any explanation of how it is wrong, just that it is the wrong use.

May 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pattymac60

I' not sure when you need the preposition "'a" and when you don't. I guess that will come with more practice

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems

In this context, jusque and à mean "until" together. If you remove "jusque" it reads as "the lion eats at the night". If you remove "à", it reads...badly...Sorry I can't help you more with that. French isn't my first language...I just know what sounds right and wrong. To tell you the truth, I probably couldn't explain why things are the way they are in English either. Hopefully someone else chimes in with an education explanation.

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pattymac60

Sometimes it´s just idiom and you have to rely on your ears. I'll run this by my French groupe on Monday

January 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexCGuest

pattymac, did you ever find an answer for this?

April 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pattymac60

As Hohenems said, it's about the following vowel sound. "Jusque tard" means until late. "Jusqu'á dimanche" means until Sunday.

December 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jaderdias

The english translation seems akward "The lion eats until night." I'm no native english speaker though

June 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

You are correct. "The lion eats until nightfall" or more commonly "The lion eats until it gets dark" would be better.

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JorgeTodes

I know! I used "until the evening" and got marked wrong.

February 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Larry327171

"Nightfall" is pretty archaic in American English. We would say "until night." But that got marked wrong.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew8510

According to the Larousse Dictionary the word "jusque, jusqu'" is a preposition that is always followed by another preposition to form its meaning.

jusque (préposition)
(anc. fr. enjusque ; lat. inde , de là et usque , jusque)
Suivi des prép. à, en, vers, dans, indique une limite spatiale ou temporelle, un point limite, un degré extrême. De Paris jusqu'à Rome. Il est allé jusqu'à la frapper.
- Jusque-là, jusqu'ici : indiquent la limite qu'on ne dépasse pas; jusqu'à ce lieu, jusqu'à ce moment.
- Fam. En avoir jusque-là : avoir atteint la limite de ce qu'on peut supporter.

jusqu'à ce que locution conjonctive
Indique la limite temporelle; jusqu'au moment où.
- REM. L'e de jusque s'élide devant une voyelle; jusque s'écrit quelquefois avec un s final, surtout en poésie : Jusques à quand ?

Le Petit Larousse illustré 1999. © Larousse, 1998.

June 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ArdeJohnson

It's not, though, we got a different sentence on here saying "jusque fin 2004". Not only were there no further prepositions, there was no article either.

EDIT: For context, the comment I originally replied to has been deleted.

January 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

Andrew

jusque is not always followed by a preposition

For example, the preposition jusque can be followed by an adverb such as bien, fort, si, ou, très modifying an adverb of time or place ( tôt, tard, loin, etc.).

example

Il a travaillé jusque très tard. - He worked until late.

November 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/casafaster

I do not believe the pronunciation of "lion" is correct. Are there any french speakers who can concur?

January 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Skqiz

Duolingo is so much fun when you imagine every phrase like this to be secret code phrases.

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Vive-Le-Francais

The lion eats until nightfall.

September 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/skyewoodrum

I lost a heart because I put jusqu'a instead of jusqu'à !!! The owl is getting picky on these accent marks.

March 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy

à is a preposition. a is a verb. They are completely different words serving much different grammatical purposes. Duo does not seem to care about accent marks only when they are ornamentation. When they serve a necessary function, Duo cares very much.

March 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lama.EgypSyrian

what is the difference between jusqu'a and jusque ?

July 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Jusqu'à is just jusque followed by à, and it's what you commonly see for "until." But if another preposition is needed, e.g. "until her house" = «jusque chez elle», then you're left with «jusque» hanging out in the wind, so to speak.

July 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/eliebarbar

What's the difference between Jusque and jusqu'a? can please someone help me out! thanks! :)

August 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Jusque is generally constructed with the preposition "à" and means up to or until, ie both temporal and spacial notions:

• J'attendrai jusqu'à son retour.

• La réunion a duré jusqu'à huit heures.

• Il le conduit jusqu'à la frontière.

• Elle l'a raccompagné jusqu'à sa maison.

Note: if another preposition is used, "à" disappears: "jusque chez lui"

When "jusque" is followed by other adverbs: "alors, ici, où", it is elided:

• Jusqu'alors, il était calme

• La forêt s'étend jusqu'ici

• Jusqu'où êtes-vous prêt à investir ?

• Ma pelouse est tondue jusque-là (note the hyphen, like other words constructed with -là: celui-là, ce jour-là...)

December 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VioletteNoire

Is it possible to say "The lion eats into the night."?

Does it make sense in English?

October 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/peterschei2

To my English speaking ears 'The lion eats into the night' makes little sense. If you said 'The lion continues eating into the night' it makes some sense, but that is not an accurate translation of DL's French sentence

October 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rasspberry

In the jungle, the mighty jungle...

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/moot3100

In th jungle, the mighty jungle, the lion eats 'til night...

September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LaureLuyckx

"In the jungle the mighty jungle the lion eats until night"

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/disc33

In the jungle, the mighty jungle, le lion mange à la nuit... A-WIMBA-WE. A-WIMBA-WE.

January 2, 2018
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